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State of Drupal presentation (September 2015)

File this under "better late than never". Before the year closes out, I wanted to post my 2015 DrupalCon Barcelona keynote video and slides. I archive all my DrupalCon keynotes on my site so anyone who is interested in taking a trip to memory lane or studying the evolution of Drupal, can check out all my previous DrupalCon keynotes.

My DrupalCon Barcelona keynote is focused on having a realistic, open and honest conversation about the state of Drupal. In it, I broke down my thoughts on Drupal's market position, development process, and "decoupled Drupal". You can watch the recording of my keynote or download a copy of my slides (PDF, 27 MB).

In addition, here are three related blog posts I wrote about the future of decoupled Drupal, having to pick a JavaScript framework for Drupal, and a proposal for how to evolve our development process, which will allow us to ship new features every 6 months rather than every 4-5 years.

State of Drupal presentation (May 2015)

I gave my State of Drupal presentation at DrupalCon Los Angeles in front of 3,000+ attendees. In case you didn't attend DrupalCon Los Angeles, you can watch the recording of my keynote or download a copy of my slides (PDF, 77 MB).

In the first part of the keynote, I talked about the history of the Drupal project, some of the challenges we overcame, and some of the lessons learned. While I have talked about our history in the past, it had been 6 years ago at DrupalCon Washington DC in 2009. In those 6 years, the Drupal community has grown so large that most people in the community don't know where we came from. Understanding the history of Drupal is important; it explains our culture, it holds us together in challenging times and provides a compass for where we are heading.

In the middle part of the keynote, I talked about what I believe is one of our biggest challenges; motivating more organizations to contribute more meaingfully to Drupal's development. Just as it is important to understand the history of Drupal, talking about the present is an important foundation for everyone in the community. It is hard to grow without the context of our current state.

In the third and last part of the keynote, I looked forward, talked about my vision for the big reverse of the web and how it relates to Drupal. The way the web is evolving provides us an opportunity to better understand our sites visitors or users and to build one-to-one relationships, something that much of our society has lost with the industrial revolution. If the web evolves the way I think it will, it will be both life changing and industry changing. While it won't be without concerns, we have a huge opportunity ahead of us, and Drupal 8 will help us build towards that future.

I'm proud of where we came from and excited for where we are headed. Take a look at the keynote if you want to learn more about it.

Growing Drupal in Latin America

When I visited Brazil in 2011, I was so impressed by the Latin American Drupal community and how active and passionate the people are. The region is fun and beautiful, with some of the most amazing sites I have seen anywhere in the world. It also happens to be a strategic region for the project.

Latin American community members are doing their part to grow the project and the Drupal community. In 2014, the region hosted 19 Global Training Day events to recruit newcomers, and community leaders coordinated many Drupal camps to help convert those new Drupal users into skilled talent. Members of the Latin American community help promote Drupal at local technology and Open Source events, visiting events like FISL (7,000+ participants), Consegi (5,000+ participants) and Latinoware (4,500+ participants).

You can see the results of all the hard work in the growth of the Latin American Drupal business ecosystem. The region has a huge number of talented developers working at agencies large and small. When they aren't creating great Drupal websites like the one for the Rio 2016 Olympics, they are contributing code back to the project. For example, during our recent Global Sprint Weekend, communities in Bolivia, Colombia, Costa Rica, and Nicaragua participated and made valuable contributions.

The community has also been instrumental in translation efforts. On localize.drupal.org, the top translation is Spanish with 500 contributors, and a significant portion of those contributors come from the Latin America region. Community members are also investing time and energy translating Drupal educational videos, conducting camps in Spanish, and even publishing a Drupal magazine in Spanish. All of these efforts lower the barrier to entry for Spanish speakers, which is incredibly important because Spanish is one of the top spoken languages in the world. While the official language of the Drupal project is English, there can be a language divide for newcomers who primarily speak other languages.

Last but not least, I am excited that we are bringing DrupalCon to Latin America next week. This is the fruit of many hours spent by passionate volunteers in the Latin American local communities, working together with the Drupal Association to figure out how to make a DrupalCon happen in this part of the world. At every DrupalCon we have had so far, we have seen an increase in energy for the project and a bump in engagement. Come for the software, stay for the community! Hasta pronto!

State of Drupal presentation (September 2014)

I gave my traditional State of Drupal presentation this week at DrupalCon Amsterdam. I decided to talk about the sustainability and scalability of the Drupal community. In case you didn't attend DrupalCon Amsterdam, you can watch the recording of my keynote, download a copy of my slides (PDF, 17 MB) or read my blog post on the topic.

Help me write my DrupalCon Amsterdam keynote

For my DrupalCon Amsterdam keynote, I want to try something slightly different. Instead of coming up with the talk track myself, I want to "crowdsource" it. In other words, I want the wider Drupal community to have direct input on the content of the keynote. I feel this will provide a great opportunity to surface questions and ideas from the people who make Drupal what it is.

In the past, I've done traditional surveys to get input for my keynote and I've also done keynotes that were Q&A from beginning to end. This time, I'd like to try something in between.

I'd love your help to identify the topics of interests (e.g. scaling our community, future of the web, information about Drupal's competitors, "headless" Drupal, the Drupal Association, the business of Open Source, sustaining core development, etc). You can make your suggestions in the comments of this blog post or on Twitter (tag them with @Dries and #driesnote). I'll handpick some topics from all the suggestions, largely based on popularity but also based on how important and meaty I think the topic is.

Then, in the lead-up to the event, I'll create discussion opportunities on some or all of the topics so we can dive deeper on them together, and surface various opinions and ideas. The result of those deeper conversations will form the basis of my DrupalCon Amsterdam keynote.

So what would you like me to talk about? Suggest your topics in the comments of this blog post or on Twitter by tagging your suggestions with #driesnote and/or @Dries. Thank you!

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