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DrupalCon

Growing Drupal in Latin America

When I visited Brazil in 2011, I was so impressed by the Latin American Drupal community and how active and passionate the people are. The region is fun and beautiful, with some of the most amazing sites I have seen anywhere in the world. It also happens to be a strategic region for the project.

Latin American community members are doing their part to grow the project and the Drupal community. In 2014, the region hosted 19 Global Training Day events to recruit newcomers, and community leaders coordinated many Drupal camps to help convert those new Drupal users into skilled talent. Members of the Latin American community help promote Drupal at local technology and Open Source events, visiting events like FISL (7,000+ participants), Consegi (5,000+ participants) and Latinoware (4,500+ participants).

You can see the results of all the hard work in the growth of the Latin American Drupal business ecosystem. The region has a huge number of talented developers working at agencies large and small. When they aren't creating great Drupal websites like the one for the Rio 2016 Olympics, they are contributing code back to the project. For example, during our recent Global Sprint Weekend, communities in Bolivia, Colombia, Costa Rica, and Nicaragua participated and made valuable contributions.

The community has also been instrumental in translation efforts. On localize.drupal.org, the top translation is Spanish with 500 contributors, and a significant portion of those contributors come from the Latin America region. Community members are also investing time and energy translating Drupal educational videos, conducting camps in Spanish, and even publishing a Drupal magazine in Spanish. All of these efforts lower the barrier to entry for Spanish speakers, which is incredibly important because Spanish is one of the top spoken languages in the world. While the official language of the Drupal project is English, there can be a language divide for newcomers who primarily speak other languages.

Last but not least, I am excited that we are bringing DrupalCon to Latin America next week. This is the fruit of many hours spent by passionate volunteers in the Latin American local communities, working together with the Drupal Association to figure out how to make a DrupalCon happen in this part of the world. At every DrupalCon we have had so far, we have seen an increase in energy for the project and a bump in engagement. Come for the software, stay for the community! Hasta pronto!

Help me write my DrupalCon Amsterdam keynote

For my DrupalCon Amsterdam keynote, I want to try something slightly different. Instead of coming up with the talk track myself, I want to "crowdsource" it. In other words, I want the wider Drupal community to have direct input on the content of the keynote. I feel this will provide a great opportunity to surface questions and ideas from the people who make Drupal what it is.

In the past, I've done traditional surveys to get input for my keynote and I've also done keynotes that were Q&A from beginning to end. This time, I'd like to try something in between.

I'd love your help to identify the topics of interests (e.g. scaling our community, future of the web, information about Drupal's competitors, "headless" Drupal, the Drupal Association, the business of Open Source, sustaining core development, etc). You can make your suggestions in the comments of this blog post or on Twitter (tag them with @Dries and #driesnote). I'll handpick some topics from all the suggestions, largely based on popularity but also based on how important and meaty I think the topic is.

Then, in the lead-up to the event, I'll create discussion opportunities on some or all of the topics so we can dive deeper on them together, and surface various opinions and ideas. The result of those deeper conversations will form the basis of my DrupalCon Amsterdam keynote.

So what would you like me to talk about? Suggest your topics in the comments of this blog post or on Twitter by tagging your suggestions with #driesnote and/or @Dries. Thank you!

State of Drupal presentation (June 2014)

I gave my traditional State of Drupal presentation this week at DrupalCon Austin. You can watch the recording of my keynote if you are interested in learning about my vision for the future of the web, the challenges and opportunities ahead of us, how Drupal fits into that. In good tradition, you can also download a copy of my slides (PDF, 120 MB).

Drupal 8 Q&A session at DrupalCon Austin

Do you have questions about the upcoming Drupal 8 release (or Drupal 9 and beyond)? On Thursday, June 5 at DrupalCon Austin, I'll be moderating a question-and-answer core conversation with a panel of key Drupal 8 contributors. Questions are submitted in advance online, and anyone can submit a question. I will curate the submissions to ask the panel the most interesting and relevant questions.

This is a rare opportunity for the community to communicate directly with the trailblazers who are shaping Drupal 8 into the best release of Drupal yet. Help us make the most of of it -- submit your questions now!

State of Drupal presentation (September 2013)

Last week in Prague, I gave my traditional State of Drupal presentation. A total of 1,830 Drupalists were present at DrupalCon, a new record for our European DrupalCon!

In good tradition, you can download a copy of my slides (PDF, 31 MB) or you can watch a video recording of my keynote. The keynote starts at 11:42, but don't miss out on the singing carrots introduction. A video recording of the keynote is embedded in this post.

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