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State of Drupal presentation (September 2016)

DrupalCon Dublin marked my 28th DrupalCon and #Driesnote presentation. You can watch a recording of my keynote (starting at 23:55) or download a copy of my slides here (185.4 MB).

The first half of the presentation I provided a technical update on Drupal 8. I showcased some of the big changes in Drupal 8.2 such as the settings tray, REST API improvements, migration tool improvements, and easier to use block placement. I also talked about how we've transformed Drupal 8 for continuous innovation. I'm super excited about our improved development process and release cycle, as it helps us ship innovative updates to Drupal 8 faster and with a much easier upgrade path.

The second half of the talk focused on "The why" of Drupal, and asked an important question for all of us to think about: what is Drupal's collective purpose? In addition to me talking about my own purpose, my team interviewed Drupal people around the world about their passion and purpose.

I featured a lot of interviews with Drupalists. If you're interested in viewing their individual videos, they're now available on my YouTube channel:

© Paul Johnson

Special thanks to Ash for the amazing design work on my slides and helping with the interviews, and Paul Johnson for the nice photo of me listening to Zsófi.

State of Drupal presentation (May 2016)

DrupalCon New Orleans comes at an important time in the history of Drupal. Now that Drupal 8 has launched, we have a lot of work to do to accelerate Drupal 8's adoption as well as plan what is next.

In my keynote presentation, I shared my thoughts on where we should focus our efforts in order for Drupal to continue its path to become the leading platform for assembling the world's best digital experiences.

Based on recent survey data, I proposed key initiatives for Drupal, as well as shared my vision for building cross-channel customer experiences that span various devices, including conversational technologies like Amazon Echo.

You can watch a recording of my keynote (starting at 3:43) or download a copy of my slides (162 MB).

There is much more data hidden in the raw survey results, so if you'd like to do your own analysis, you can download a copy of the raw survey results (CSV format or XLS format) and look at the raw data yourself. I anonymized the data by removing the names, e-mail addresses and IP address information. If you decide to analyze the raw data, consider sharing your findings with all of us.

Take a look, and as always feel free to leave your opinions in the comments!

State of Drupal presentation (February 2016)

I was excited to travel to India a few months ago for DrupalCon, an area where we have a really big opportunity for the growth of Drupal. In keeping with tradition, here are the slides and video from my keynote presentation. You can watch the recording of my keynote (starting at 20:15) or download a copy of my slides (PDF, 158 MB).

The main areas of focus for the talk included Drupal's rapid growth and progress in India, key technology trends driving the future of the web, and how Drupal is responding to these trends. As a call-to-action, I encouraged Drupalists in India to form grassroots communities locally, to become a part of the larger Drupal community conversation, and to port modules from Drupal 7 to Drupal 8 to accelerate its adoption.

Have a look and as always, feel free to leave your thoughts in the comments!

The rise of Drupal in India

Earlier this week I returned from DrupalCon Asia, which took place at IIT Bombay, one of India's premier engineering universities. I wish I could have bottled up all the energy and excitement to take home with me. From dancing on stage, to posing for what felt like a million selfies, to a motorcycle giveaway, this DrupalCon was unlike any I've seen before.

Drupalcon group photo
A little over 1,000 people attended the first DrupalCon in India. For 82% of the attendees, it was their first DrupalCon. There was also much better gender diversity than at other DrupalCons.

The excitement and interest around Drupal has been growing fast since I last visited in 2011. DrupalCamp attendance in both Delhi and Mumbai has exceeded 500 participants. There have also been DrupalCamps held in Hyderabad, Bangalore, Pune, Ahmedabad Jaipur, Srinagar, Kerala and other areas.

Indian Drupal companies like QED42, Axelerant, Srijan and ValueBound have made meaningful contributions to Drupal 8. The reason? Visibility on through the credit system helps them win deals and hire the best talent. ValueBound said it best when I spoke to them: "With our visibility on, we no longer have to explain why we are a great place to work and that we are experts in Drupal.".

Also present were the large System Integrators (Wipro, TATA Consultancy Services, CapGemini, Accenture, MindTree, etc). TATA Consultancy Services has 400+ Drupalists in India, well ahead of the others who have between 100 and 200 Drupalists each. Large digital agencies such as Mirum and AKQA also sent people to DrupalCon. They are all expanding their Drupal teams in India to service the needs of growing sales in other offices around the world. The biggest challenge across the board? Finding Drupal talent. I was told that TATA Consultancy Services allows many of its developers to contribute back to Drupal, which is why they have been able to hire faster. More evidence that the credit system is working in India.

The government is quickly adopting Drupal. is one of many great examples; this portal was established by India's central government to promote citizen participation in government affairs. The site reached nearly two million registered users in less than a year. The government's shifting attitude toward open source is a big deal because historically, the Indian government has pushed back against open source because large organizations like Microsoft were funding many of the educational programs in India. The tide changed in 2015 when the Indian government announced that open source software should be preferred over proprietary software for all e-government projects. Needless to say, this is great news for Drupal.

Another initiative that stood out was the Drupal Campus Ambassador Program. The aim of this program is to appoint Drupal ambassadors in every university in India to introduce more students to Drupal and help them with their job search. It is early days for the program, but I recommend we pay attention to it, and consider scaling it out globally if successful.

Last but not least there was FOSSEE (Free and Open Source Software for Education), a government-funded program that promotes open source software in academic institutions, along with its sister project, Spoken Tutorial. To date, 2,500 colleges participate in the program and more than 1 million students have been trained on open source software. With the spoken part of their videos translated into 22 local languages, students gain the ability to self-study and foster their education outside of the classroom. I was excited to hear that FOSSEE plans to add a Spoken Tutorial series on Drupal course to its offerings. There is a strong demand for affordable Drupal training and certifications throughout India's technical colleges, so the idea of encouraging millions of Indian students to take a free Drupal course is very exciting -- even if only 1% of them decides to contribute back this could be a total game changer.

Open source makes a lot of sense for India's thriving tech community. It is difficult to grasp the size of the opportunity for Drupal in India and how fast its adoption has been growing. I have a feeling I will be back in India more than once to help support this growing commitment to Drupal and open source.

State of Drupal presentation (September 2015)

File this under "better late than never". Before the year closes out, I wanted to post my 2015 DrupalCon Barcelona keynote video and slides. I archive all my DrupalCon keynotes on my site so anyone who is interested in taking a trip to memory lane or studying the evolution of Drupal, can check out all my previous DrupalCon keynotes.

My DrupalCon Barcelona keynote is focused on having a realistic, open and honest conversation about the state of Drupal. In it, I broke down my thoughts on Drupal's market position, development process, and "decoupled Drupal". You can watch the recording of my keynote or download a copy of my slides (PDF, 27 MB).

In addition, here are three related blog posts I wrote about the future of decoupled Drupal, having to pick a JavaScript framework for Drupal, and a proposal for how to evolve our development process, which will allow us to ship new features every 6 months rather than every 4-5 years.


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