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State of Drupal presentation (February 2016)

I was excited to travel to India a few months ago for DrupalCon, an area where we have a really big opportunity for the growth of Drupal. In keeping with tradition, here are the slides and video from my keynote presentation. You can watch the recording of my keynote (starting at 20:15) or download a copy of my slides (PDF, 158 MB).

The main areas of focus for the talk included Drupal's rapid growth and progress in India, key technology trends driving the future of the web, and how Drupal is responding to these trends. As a call-to-action, I encouraged Drupalists in India to form grassroots communities locally, to become a part of the larger Drupal community conversation, and to port modules from Drupal 7 to Drupal 8 to accelerate its adoption.

Have a look and as always, feel free to leave your thoughts in the comments!

How should you decouple Drupal?

With RESTful web services in Drupal 8 core, Drupal can function as an API-first back end serving browser applications, native applications on mobile devices, in-store displays, even in-flight entertainment systems (Lufthansa is doing so in Drupal 8!), and much more. When building a new website or web application in 2016, you may ask yourself: how should I decouple Drupal? Do I build my website with Drupal's built-in templating layer or do I use a JavaScript framework? Do I need Node.js?

There is a lot of hype around decoupled architectures, so before embarking on a project, it is important to make a balanced analysis. Your choice of architecture has implications on your budget, your team, time to launch, the flexibility for content creators, the ongoing maintenance of your website, and more. In this blog post, I'd like to share a flowchart that can help you decide when to use what technology.

Decoupled decision flowchart

This flowchart shows three things:

First, using coupled Drupal is a perfectly valid option for those who don't need extensive client-side rendering and state management. In this case, you would use Drupal's built-in Twig templating system rather than heavily relying on a JavaScript framework. You would use jQuery to take advantage of limited JavaScript where necessary. Also, with BigPipe in Drupal 8.1, certain use cases that typically needed asynchronous JavaScript can now be done in PHP without slowing down the page (i.e. communication with an external web service delaying the display of user-specific real-time data). The advantage of this approach is that content marketers are not blocked by front-end developers as they assemble their user experiences, thus shortening time to market and reducing investment in ongoing developer support.

Second, if you want all of the benefits of a JavaScript framework without completely bypassing Drupal's HTML generation and all that you get with it, I recommend using progressively decoupled Drupal. With progressive decoupling, you start with Drupal's HTML output, and then use a JavaScript framework to add client-side interactivity on the client side. One of the most visited sites in the world, The Weather Channel (100 million unique visitors per month), does precisely this with Angular 1 layered on top of Drupal 7. In this case, you can enjoy the benefits of having a “decoupled" team made up of both Drupal and JavaScript developers progressing at their own velocities. JavaScript developers can build richly interactive experiences while leaving content marketers free to assemble those experiences without needing a developer's involvement.

Third, whereas fully decoupled Drupal makes a lot of sense when building native applications, for most websites, the leap to fully decoupling is not strictly necessary, though a growing number of people prefer using JavaScript these days. Advantages include some level of independence on the underlying CMS, the ability to tap into a rich toolset around JavaScript (e.g. Babel, Webpack, etc.) and a community of JavaScript front-end professionals. But if you are using a universal JavaScript approach with Drupal, it's also important to consider the drawbacks: you need to ask yourself if you're ready to add more complexity to your technology stack and possibly forgo functionality provided by a more integrated content delivery system, such as layout and display management, user interface localization, and more. Losing that functionality can be costly, increase your dependence on a developer team, and hinder the end-to-end content assembly experience your marketing team expects, among other things.

It's worth noting that over time we are likely to see better integrations between Drupal and the different JavaScript frameworks (e.g. Drupal modules that export their configuration, and SDKs for different JavaScript frameworks that use that configuration on the client-side). When those integrations mature, I expect more people will move towards fully decoupled Drupal.

To be performant, fully decoupled websites using JavaScript employ Node.js on the server to improve initial performance, but in the case of Drupal this is not necessary, as Drupal can do the server-side pre-rendering for you. Many JavaScript developers opt to use Node.js for the convenience of shared rendering across server and client rather than for the specific things that Node.js excels in, like real-time push, concurrent connections, and bidirectional client-server communication. In other words, most Drupal websites don't need Node.js.

Decoupled delivery architectures

In practice, I believe many organizations want to use all of these content delivery options. In certain cases, you want to let your content management system render the experience so you can take full advantage of its features with minimal or no development effort (coupled architecture). But when you need to build a website that needs a much more interactive experience or that integrates with unique devices (i.e. on in-store touch screens), you should be able to use that same content management system's content API (decoupled architecture). Fortunately, Drupal allows you to use either. The beauty of choosing from the spectrum of fully decoupled Drupal, progressively decoupled Drupal, and coupled Drupal is that you can do what makes the most sense in each situation.

Special thanks to Preston So, Alex Bronstein and Wim Leers for their contributions to this blog post. We created at least 10 versions of this flowchart before settling on this one.

A "MAP" for accelerating Drupal 8 adoption

Contributed modules in Drupal deliver the functionality and innovation proprietary content management solutions simply can't match. With every new version of Drupal comes the need to quickly move modules forward from the previous version. For users of Drupal, it's crucial to know they can depend on the availability of modules when considering a new Drupal 8 project or migrating from a previous version.

I'm pleased that many agencies and customers who use Drupal are donating time and attention to maintaining Drupal's module repository and ensuring their contributed modules are upgraded. I believe it's the responsibility of Drupal companies to give back to the community.

I'm proud that Acquia leads by example. It was with great pride that Acquia created a Drupal 8 Module Acceleration Program, or MAP. Led by Acquia's John Kennedy, MAP brings financial, technical and project management assistance to Drupal module maintainers. Acquia kicked off MAP in mid-October and to date we have helped complete production-ready versions of 34 modules. And it is not just any modules; we've been focused on those modules that provide critical pieces of functionality used by most Drupal sites.

When MAP was formed Acquia allocated $500,000 to fund non-Acquia maintainers in the community. In addition, we have so far invested more than 2,500 hours of our own developers' time to support the effort (the equivalent of three full-time developers).

What is impressive to me about MAP is both the focus on mission-critical modules that benefit a huge number of users, as well as the number of community members and agencies involved. John's team is leading a coalition of the best and brightest minds in the Drupal community to address the single biggest obstacle holding Drupal 8 adoption back.

Drupal 8 has already made a significant impact; in the 90 days following the release of Drupal 8.0.0, adoption has outpaced Drupal 7 by more than 200 percent. And as more modules get ported, I expect Drupal 8 adoption to accelerate even more.

White House deepens its commitment to Open Source

Yesterday, the White House announced a plan to deepen its commitment to open source. Under this plan, new, custom-developed government software must be made available for use across other federal agencies, and a portion of all projects must be made open source and shared with the public. This plan will make it much easier to share best practices, collaborate, and save money across different government departments.

However, there are still some questions to address. In good open source style, the White House is inviting developers to comment on this policy. As the Drupal community we should take advantage and comment on GitHub within the 30-day feedback window.

The White House has a long open source history with Drupal. In October 2009, WhiteHouse.gov relaunched on Drupal and shortly thereafter started to actively contribute back to Drupal -- both were a first in the history of the White House. White House's contributions to Drupal include the "We the People" petitions platform, which was adopted by other governments and organizations around the world.

This week's policy is big news because it will push open source deeper into the roots of the U.S. government, requiring more government agencies to become active open source contributors. We'll be able to solve problems faster and, together, build better software for citizens across the U.S.

I'm excited to see how this plays out in the coming months!

The rise of Drupal in India

Earlier this week I returned from DrupalCon Asia, which took place at IIT Bombay, one of India's premier engineering universities. I wish I could have bottled up all the energy and excitement to take home with me. From dancing on stage, to posing for what felt like a million selfies, to a motorcycle giveaway, this DrupalCon was unlike any I've seen before.

Drupalcon group photo
A little over 1,000 people attended the first DrupalCon in India. For 82% of the attendees, it was their first DrupalCon. There was also much better gender diversity than at other DrupalCons.

The excitement and interest around Drupal has been growing fast since I last visited in 2011. DrupalCamp attendance in both Delhi and Mumbai has exceeded 500 participants. There have also been DrupalCamps held in Hyderabad, Bangalore, Pune, Ahmedabad Jaipur, Srinagar, Kerala and other areas.

Indian Drupal companies like QED42, Axelerant, Srijan and ValueBound have made meaningful contributions to Drupal 8. The reason? Visibility on Drupal.org through the credit system helps them win deals and hire the best talent. ValueBound said it best when I spoke to them: "With our visibility on drupal.org, we no longer have to explain why we are a great place to work and that we are experts in Drupal.".

Also present were the large System Integrators (Wipro, TATA Consultancy Services, CapGemini, Accenture, MindTree, etc). TATA Consultancy Services has 400+ Drupalists in India, well ahead of the others who have between 100 and 200 Drupalists each. Large digital agencies such as Mirum and AKQA also sent people to DrupalCon. They are all expanding their Drupal teams in India to service the needs of growing sales in other offices around the world. The biggest challenge across the board? Finding Drupal talent. I was told that TATA Consultancy Services allows many of its developers to contribute back to Drupal, which is why they have been able to hire faster. More evidence that the credit system is working in India.

The government is quickly adopting Drupal. MyGov.in is one of many great examples; this portal was established by India's central government to promote citizen participation in government affairs. The site reached nearly two million registered users in less than a year. The government's shifting attitude toward open source is a big deal because historically, the Indian government has pushed back against open source because large organizations like Microsoft were funding many of the educational programs in India. The tide changed in 2015 when the Indian government announced that open source software should be preferred over proprietary software for all e-government projects. Needless to say, this is great news for Drupal.

Another initiative that stood out was the Drupal Campus Ambassador Program. The aim of this program is to appoint Drupal ambassadors in every university in India to introduce more students to Drupal and help them with their job search. It is early days for the program, but I recommend we pay attention to it, and consider scaling it out globally if successful.

Last but not least there was FOSSEE (Free and Open Source Software for Education), a government-funded program that promotes open source software in academic institutions, along with its sister project, Spoken Tutorial. To date, 2,500 colleges participate in the program and more than 1 million students have been trained on open source software. With the spoken part of their videos translated into 22 local languages, students gain the ability to self-study and foster their education outside of the classroom. I was excited to hear that FOSSEE plans to add a Spoken Tutorial series on Drupal course to its offerings. There is a strong demand for affordable Drupal training and certifications throughout India's technical colleges, so the idea of encouraging millions of Indian students to take a free Drupal course is very exciting -- even if only 1% of them decides to contribute back this could be a total game changer.

Open source makes a lot of sense for India's thriving tech community. It is difficult to grasp the size of the opportunity for Drupal in India and how fast its adoption has been growing. I have a feeling I will be back in India more than once to help support this growing commitment to Drupal and open source.

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