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BigPipe, no longer just for the top 50 websites

One thing that is exciting to me, is how much we appear to have gotten right in Drupal 8. The other day, for example, I stumbled upon a recent article from the LinkedIn engineering team describing how the completely changed how their homepage is built. Their primary engineering objective was to deliver the fastest page load time possible, and one of the crucial ingredients to achieve that was Facebook's BigPipe.

I discussed BigPipe on my blog before: first when I wrote about making Drupal 8 fly and later when I wrote about decoupled Drupal. Since then, Drupal 8 shipped with BigPipe support.

When a very high-profile, very high-traffic, highly personalized site like LinkedIn uses the same technique as Drupal 8, that solidifies my belief in Drupal 8.

LinkedIn supports both server-side and client-side rendering. While Drupal 8 does server-side rendering, we're still missing explicit support for client-side rendering. The advantage of client-side rendering versus server-side rendering is debatable. I've touched upon it in my blog post on progressive decoupling, but I'll address the topic of client-side rendering in a future blog post.

However, there is also something LinkedIn could learn from Drupal! Every component of a LinkedIn page that should be delivered via BigPipe needs to write BigPipe-specific code which is prone to errors and requires all engineers to be familiar with BigPipe. Drupal 8 on the other hand has a level of abstraction that allows BigPipe to work without the need for BigPipe-specific code. Thanks to Drupal's higher-level API, Drupal module developers don't have to understand BigPipe: Drupal 8 knows what page components are poorly cacheable or not cacheable at all, and what page components are renderable in isolation, and uses that information to automatically optimize the delivery of page components using BigPipe.

It is exciting to see Drupal support the advanced techniques that were previously only within reach of the top 50 most visited sites of the world! Drupal's BigPipe support will benefit websites small and large.

Drupal 8 milestones in Tweets

Building Drupal 8 with all of you has been a wild ride. I thought it would be fun to take a little end-of-week look back at some of our community's biggest milestones through Twitter. If you can think of others important Tweets, please share them in the comments, and I'll update the post.

Feeling nostalgic? See every single version of Drupal running!

Here is how we opened the development branch for Drupal 8: live at Drupalcon!

Drupal 8's first beta showed the power of community

We had issues ... but the queue steadily declined

We held sprints around the world: here are just a few

And we created many game-changing features

The founder of PHP said: Drupal 8 + PHP7 = a lot of happy people

We reached the first release candidate and celebrated ... a little

And, just yesterday, we painted the world blue and celebrated Drupal 8 ... a lot!

Drupal 8.0.0 released

We just released Drupal 8.0.0! Today really marks the beginning of a new era for Drupal. Over the course of almost five years, we've brought the work of more than 3,000 contributors together to make something that is more flexible, more innovative, more easy to use, and more scalable.

Drupal 8 has been a big transformation for our community. This particular reboot has taken one-third of Drupal's lifespan to complete. In the process we've learned that reinvention doesn't come easily or quickly. There are huge market forces happening around us, and we can't exactly look away. Mobile is moving our society to near-universal, global internet access. Most companies have begun to transform themselves digitally, leaving established business models and old business processes in the dust. Digital experience builders are turning to platforms that give them greater flexibility, better usability, better integrations, and faster innovation. The pace of change in the digital world has become dizzying. If we were to ignore these market forces, Drupal would be caught flat-footed and quickly become irrelevant.

But we didn't. I'm proud to see that we've responded to these market forces with Drupal 8, and delivered a robust, solid product that can be used to build next-generation websites, web applications and digital experiences. We've implemented a more modern development framework, reimagined the usability and authoring experience, and made technical improvements that will help us build for the multilingual, mobile and highly personalized experiences of the future. From how we model content and get content in and out the system, to how we build and assemble experiences on various devices, to how we scale that to millions and millions of pageviews -- it all got much better with Drupal 8.

I'm personally incredibly proud of this release. Drupal 8 is the result of years of hard work and innovation by thousands of people, with lots of attention to detail at every level. Congratulations to everyone who stepped up to contribute; this was only possible thanks to your persistence and tireless hard work. It took a lot of learning, our best thinking and our best people to create Drupal 8, and I'm very, very proud of what we have accomplished together.

For 15 years, I have believed that Open Source offers significant advantages to proprietary solutions through superior innovation. Today, I believe that more than ever. Drupal 8 is another key milestone in helping us win and doing what is best for an open web. Of course, our job is not done but now is the time to have fun and celebrate this monumental milestone. Tonight, we'll be hosting more than 200 parties around the world! (It's also my 37th birthday today and the release of Drupal 8 along with all those parties is pretty much the best present ever!)

Loosen control the Open Source way

A couple of weeks ago a Chief Digital Officer (CDO) of one of the largest mobile telecommunications companies in the world asked me how a large organization such as hers should think about organizing itself to maintain control over costs and risks while still giving their global organization the freedom to innovate.

When it comes to managing their websites and the digital customer experience, they have over 50 different platforms managed by local teams in over 50 countries around the world. Her goal is to improve operational efficiency, improve brand consistency, and set governance by standardizing on a central platform. The challenge is that they have no global IT organization that can force the different teams to re-platform.

When asked if I had any insights from my work with other large global organizations, it occurred to me the ideal model she is seeking is very aligned to how an Open Source project like Drupal is managed (a subject I have more than a passing interest in).

Teams in different countries around the world often demand full control and decision-making authority over their own web properties and reject centralization. How then might someone in a large organization get the rest of the organization to rally behind a single platform and encourage individual teams and departments to innovate and share their innovations within the organization?

In a large Open Source project such as Drupal, contributions to the project can come from anywhere. On the one extreme there are corporate sponsors who cover the cost of full-time contributors, and on the other extreme there are individuals making substantial contributions from dorm rooms, basements, and cabins in the woods. Open Source's contribution models are incredible at coordinating, accepting, evaluating, and tracking the contributions from a community of contributors distributed around the world. Can that model be applied in the enterprise so contributions can come from every team or individual in the organization?

Reams have been written on how to incubate innovation, how to source it from the wisdom of the crowd, ignite it in the proverbial garage, or buy it from some entrepreneurial upstart. For large organizations like the mobile telecommunications company this CDO works at, innovation is about building, like Open Source, communities of practice where a culture of test-and-learn is encouraged, and sharing -- the essence of Open Source -- is rewarded. Consider the library of modules available to extend Drupal: there can be several contributed solutions for a particular need -- say embedding a carousel of images or adding commerce capability to a site -- all developed independently by different developers, but all available to the community to test, evaluate and implement. It may seem redundant (some would argue inefficient) to have multiple options available for the same task, but the fact that there are multiple solutions means more choices for people building experiences. It's inconceivable for a proprietary software company to fund five different teams to develop five different modules for the same task. They develop one and that is what their customers get. In a global innovation network, teams have the freedom to experiment and share their solutions with their peers -- but only if there is a structure and culture in place that rewards sharing them through a single platform.

Centers of Excellence (CoEs) are familiar models to share expertise and build alignment around a digital strategy in a decentralized, global enterprise. Some form multiple CoEs around shared utility functions such as advanced data analytics, search engine optimization, social media monitoring, and content management. CoEs have also grown to include Communities of Practice (CoP) where various "communities" of people doing similar things for different products or functions in multiple departments or locations, coalesce to share insights and techniques. In companies I've worked with that have standardized on Drupal, I've seen internal Drupal Camps and hackathons pop up much as they do within the Drupal community at-large.

My advice to her? Loosen control without losing control.

That may sound like a "have-your-cake-and-eat-it-too" cliche, but the Open Source model grew around models of crowd-sourced collaboration, constant and transparent communications, meritocracies, and a governance model that provides the platform and structure to keep the community pointed at a common goal. What would my guidance be for getting started?

  1. Start with a small pilot. Build that pilot around a team that includes the different functions of local country teams and bring them together into one working model where they can evangelize their peers and become the nucleus of a future CoE "community". Usually, one or more champions will arise from that.
  2. Establish a collaboration model where innovations can be shared back to the rest of the organization, and where each innovation can be analyzed and discussed. This is the essence of Drupal's model with acting as the clearing house for contributions coming in from everywhere in the world.

Drupal and Open Source were created to address a need, and from their small beginnings grew something large and powerful. It is a model any business can replicate within their organization. So take a page out of the Open Source playbook: innovate, collaborate and share. Governance and innovation can coexist, but for that to happen, you have to give up a measure of control and start to think outside the box. on Drupal, one year later

The web has done wonders to make government more accessible to its citizens. Take the State of New York; is a perfect example of taking a people-centric approach to digital government. The site lets people easily access state government news and services, including real-time public transit updates, employment resources, healthcare information, and more.

One year ago, The State of New York redesigned and relaunched their website on Drupal in partnership with Code and Theory and Acquia. Today, one year later, they’ve nearly tripled the audience to more than 6 million users. The most-visited part of the site is the services section, which aligns well with the governor’s priority to provide better customer service to state residents. Annual pageviews have quadrupled since launch to a record high of more than 17 million and mobile usage has increased 275 percent.

For more details, check out the press release that the State of New York published today.


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