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Megan Sanicki to become Executive Director at the Drupal Association

This is a time of transition for the Drupal Association. As you might have read on the Drupal Association blog, Holly Ross, our Executive Director, is moving on. Megan Sanicki, who has been with the Drupal Association for almost 6 years, and was working alongside Holly as the Drupal Association's COO, will take over Holly's role as the Executive Director.

Open source stewardship is not easy but in the 3 years Holly was leading the Drupal Association, she lead with passion, determination and transparency. She operationalized the Drupal Association and built a team that truly embraces its mission to serve the community, growing that team by over 50% over three years of her tenure. She established a relationship with the community that wasn't there before, allowing the Drupal Association to help in new ways like supporting the Drupal 8 launch, providing test infrastructure, implementing the Drupal contribution credit system, and more. Holly also matured our DrupalCon, expanding its reach to more users with conferences in Latin America and India. She also executed the Drupal 8 Accelerate Fund, which allowed direct funding of key contributors to help lead Drupal 8 to a successful release.

Holly did a lot for Drupal. She touched all of us in the Drupal community. She helped us become better and work closer together. It is sad to see her leave, but I'm confident she'll find success in future endeavors. Thanks, Holly!

Megan, the Drupal Association staff and the Board of Directors are committed to supporting the Drupal project. In this time of transition, we are focused on the work that Drupal Association must do and looking at how to do that in a sustainable way so we can support the project for many years to come.

Growing Drupal in Latin America

When I visited Brazil in 2011, I was so impressed by the Latin American Drupal community and how active and passionate the people are. The region is fun and beautiful, with some of the most amazing sites I have seen anywhere in the world. It also happens to be a strategic region for the project.

Latin American community members are doing their part to grow the project and the Drupal community. In 2014, the region hosted 19 Global Training Day events to recruit newcomers, and community leaders coordinated many Drupal camps to help convert those new Drupal users into skilled talent. Members of the Latin American community help promote Drupal at local technology and Open Source events, visiting events like FISL (7,000+ participants), Consegi (5,000+ participants) and Latinoware (4,500+ participants).

You can see the results of all the hard work in the growth of the Latin American Drupal business ecosystem. The region has a huge number of talented developers working at agencies large and small. When they aren't creating great Drupal websites like the one for the Rio 2016 Olympics, they are contributing code back to the project. For example, during our recent Global Sprint Weekend, communities in Bolivia, Colombia, Costa Rica, and Nicaragua participated and made valuable contributions.

The community has also been instrumental in translation efforts. On localize.drupal.org, the top translation is Spanish with 500 contributors, and a significant portion of those contributors come from the Latin America region. Community members are also investing time and energy translating Drupal educational videos, conducting camps in Spanish, and even publishing a Drupal magazine in Spanish. All of these efforts lower the barrier to entry for Spanish speakers, which is incredibly important because Spanish is one of the top spoken languages in the world. While the official language of the Drupal project is English, there can be a language divide for newcomers who primarily speak other languages.

Last but not least, I am excited that we are bringing DrupalCon to Latin America next week. This is the fruit of many hours spent by passionate volunteers in the Latin American local communities, working together with the Drupal Association to figure out how to make a DrupalCon happen in this part of the world. At every DrupalCon we have had so far, we have seen an increase in energy for the project and a bump in engagement. Come for the software, stay for the community! Hasta pronto!

Attitude beats experience

The older I get, the quicker the years seem to fly by. As I begin to reflect on a great 2014, one thing is crystal clear again. People are the most important thing to any organization. Having a great team is more important than having a great idea. A good team will figure out how to make something great happen; they'll pivot, evolve and claw their way to success. I see it every day at Acquia, the Drupal Association or the Drupal community. I'm fortunate to be surrounded by so many great people.

By extension, recruiting is serious business. How do you figure out if someone is a great fit for your organization? Books have been written about finding and attracting the right people, but for me the following quote from Dee Hock, the founder of Visa, sums it up perfectly.

"Hire and promote first on the basis of integrity; second, motivation; third, capacity; fourth, understanding; fifth, knowledge; and last and least, experience. Without integrity, motivation is dangerous; without motivation, capacity is impotent; without capacity, understanding is limited; without understanding, knowledge is meaningless; without knowledge, experience is blind." — Dee Hock, founder of Visa.

Most hiring managers get it wrong and focus primarily on experience. While experience can be important, attitude is much more important. Attitude, not experience, is what creates a strong positive culture and what turns users and customers into raving fans.

Announcing the Drupal 8 Accelerate Fund

Today the Drupal Association announced a new program: the Drupal 8 Accelerate Fund. Drupal 8 Accelerate Fund is a $125,000 USD fund to help solve critical issues and accelerate the release of Drupal 8.

The Drupal Association is guaranteeing the funds and will try to raise more from individual members and organizations within the Drupal community. It is the Drupal 8 branch maintainers — Nathaniel Catchpole, Alex Pott, Angie Byron, and myself — who will decide on how the money is spent. The fund provides for both "top-down" (directed by the Drupal 8 branch maintainers) and "bottom-up" (requested by other community members) style grants. The money will be used on things that positively impact the Drupal 8 release date, such as hiring contributors to fix critical bugs, sponsoring code sprints to fix specific issues, and other community proposals.

Since the restructuring of the Drupal Association, I have encouraged the Drupal Association staff and Board of Directors to grow into our ambitious mission; to unite a global open source community to build and promote Drupal. I've also written and talked about the fact that scaling Open Source communities is really hard. The Drupal 8 Accelerate Fund is an experiment with crowdsourcing as a means to help scale our community which is unique compared to other efforts because it is backed by the official non-profit organization that fosters and supports Drupal.

I feel that the establishment of this fund is an important step towards more sustainable core development. My hope is that if this round of funding is successful that this can grow over time to levels that could make an even more meaningful impact on core, particularly if we complement this with other approaches and steps, such as organization credit on Drupal.org.

This is also an opportunity for Drupal companies to give back to Drupal 8 development. The Drupal Association board is challenging itself to raise $62,500 USD (half of the total amount) to support this program. If you are an organization who can help support this challenge, please let us know. If you're a community member with a great idea on how we might be able to spend this money to help accelerate Drupal 8, you can apply for a grant today.

About today’s Drupal Association Board resignation

Today Morten Birch Heide-Jørgensen stepped down from his role on the Drupal Association's Board of Directors. The Drupal Association's Board of Directors supports Morten’s decision. The Drupal Association and the Drupal community value inclusivity and diversity, and our leadership must demonstrate those values as well.

We want to thank Morten for his service; he came to the board with a mission to foster improved transparency and communication. He helped both the board and staff embrace those principles in a way that will carry into the future.

Today’s development underscores the need for a broader discussion that we need to have about inclusivity and diversity. Creating and maintaining the right culture and environment is vital to Drupal's success. Therefore, we have asked the Community Working Group to define a process to help our community address these issues and identify positive, proactive, and concrete steps we can take to ensure that everyone feels welcome in Drupal.

Morten is vacating a community elected seat. The Board of Directors will discuss how and when to fill this vacancy at the next board meeting.

Respectfully,

Drupal Association Board of Directors

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