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Acquia raises $15 million series D

I'm thrilled to announce that Acquia has received $15 million in its fourth round of funding -- that is about twice as much as any of our earlier rounds (series A, series B, series C). Our previous investors affirmed their confidence by participating in this round; they were joined by Tenaya Capital, which has roots in both the San Francisco Bay Area and our home turf of Boston. Tenaya brings more than money: Tenaya's Brian Paul will join our Board of Directors as well.

This is an incredibly exciting time to be at Acquia. Since the series C last November, our staff size has almost doubled, from 70 to 130. We're bursting out of our office space and will be moving to a bigger, 35,000 square feet office soon. We needed all those people to service our thousand-plus enterprise customers, and to plan for the future with new initiatives, such as Dev Cloud and the newly revised Acquia Network. We broke revenue records in Q1 and Q2 this year, following an extremely successful 2010.

Fundraising rounds usually occur either when a company is doing very well, or when it's doing very badly. When it's doing well, investors want to get in on the action to score big. When it's doing badly, current investors hope to turn it around to avoid losing everything they'd already put into it. By all measures, Acquia is doing very well, and this round of funding only confirms that. This is what is called a "growth round", with the money directed toward two objectives:

  • Increase sales and marketing, particularly outside the U.S.. It's clear that there are tremendous opportunities for enterprise Drupal outside of the U.S., as our partners prove every day. We'll start by focusing on Western Europe, but are already planning expansion into Asia.
  • Acquire talent and products that complement Acquia's own. These "acquia-sitions" (as we jokingly call them) will continue to beef up our staff, expand our product offerings, and respond to requests we've gotten over our three and a half years in business.

Acquia's growth is a testament to the growth of Drupal; we'll continue to give back to the Drupal community in everything what we do. Acquia wouldn't have made it this far without our customers, our partners, our employees and our friends. Thank you!

My week in review: week #2

I'm tracking my work related activities because people often ask me what my days look like. For one month, I'm posting a weekly summary of my work week (e.g. Monday - Friday, not including weekend work). I'll post four summaries in total as that should give people a good sense. This is the summary of the second week. You can compare it with the summary of the first week, if you like.

Activity Organization Hours Comments
Business development Acquia 5 Meetings with (potential) partners
E-mail Acquia 5
Human resources Acquia 2.5 Interviewing potential hires
Management meetings Acquia 2.5 Weekly status meeting with updates from sales, marketing and engineering.
Staff meeting Acquia 2.5 All company update meeting
Product / engineering management Acquia 5 Reviewed marketing, sales and engineering progress of different Acquia products, and brainstormed about resource allocation
Transportation Acquia 12 Driving to work and trip to Washington DC
Writing code Acquia 0
Preparing presentation slides Acquia 2 Gave 2 presentations that required preparation. Fortunately got some help from marketing.
Attending conferences Acquia 6 Gave one keynote at a cloud event, and gave one presentation at 360info/AIIM in Washington DC
Blogging Drupal 2 Wrote 3 short blog posts
Drupal 8 initiatives Drupal 4 Talked to potential initiative owners for Configuration Management, HTML5 and Design
Drupal Association Drupal 1 Started planning a face-to-face meeting with the Board of Directors in early May
E-mail Drupal 7
Reviewing Drupal core patches Drupal 2
Press interviews Drupal 1 Did two short interviews about Open Source and online collaboration
Writing code Drupal 0
E-mail Mollom 2 Helped close two large new customers
Product / engineering management Mollom 1 Refined our engineering methodology and reviewed some user interface designs
Writing code Mollom 0

My week in review: week #1

Every week, people ask me what exactly I do and how I balance my time. As such, I've decided to keep track of my work related activities and to record the time that I spent on them. The next four weeks, I'll try to post a weekly summary of my work week (e.g. Monday - Friday).

Activity Organization Hours Comments
Business development Acquia 2 Meetings with (potential) Acquia partners
E-mail Acquia 4
Human resources Acquia 1.5 Career guiding, interviewing potential hires
Management meetings Acquia 5 Strategic planning/brainstorming/review meetings with sales, marketing, engineering, etc
Product / engineering management Acquia 4.5 Roadmap planning for Drupal Gardens, Acquia Cloud, Acquia Network and Drupal Commons
Research Acquia 2
Sales meetings Acquia 2 Meetings with (potential) Acquia customers
Transportation Acquia 6.5 Driving to work and driving to meetings
Investor relations Acquia 0.5 Communicating with investors
Writing code Acquia 0
Attending conferences Drupal 6 Gave one keynote at Harvard Club and one presentation at the IBM Innovation Center for IEEE/ACM
Blogging Drupal 2 Processed my DrupalCon pictures and wrote 3 short blog posts
Drupal 8 initiatives Drupal 3.5 Talked to potential initiative owners and read up on proposals
Drupal Association Drupal 4 Drupal Association board meeting, phone calls with other Board Members, and working with Executive Director in preparation of the board meeting
E-mail Drupal 7.5
Preparing presentation slides Drupal 3 Gave 2 presentations that required preparation
Radio interview Drupal 1 Interview with Federal News Radio to talk about Drupal in government
Reviewing Drupal core patches Drupal 0.5
Transportation Drupal 1.5
Writing code Drupal 0
E-mail Mollom 1
Management meetings Mollom 1 Weekly planning/review meeting
Product / engineering management Mollom 6 Reviewed the results of the last engineering sprint, and coordinated the next engineering sprint
Writing code Mollom 0

This week may have been slightly more busy than normal. Also, most weeks I spent more time reviewing Drupal patches -- this week most of that time went into starting up the Drupal 8 initiatives and catching up with things after DrupalCon. Other than that, this was a pretty common week.

Acquia product strategy and vision

In my Acquia 2010 retrospective, I promised to write a bit more about Acquia's product strategy. This blog post provides a high level view of the vision that we've been working towards for the last 3 years, and explains how Acquia can help simplify your web strategy.

The web: it's currently a mess

Acquia strategy product vision

Ten years ago, the average organization had one website. Since then, doing business through the web has become more complex and have introduced a diverse set of needs. If you're like most organizations the number of sites you have is large and continues to grow at a rapid clip.

For most organizations, one tool could not historically get the job done, so they kept multiple tools in their toolbox – whether they intended to or not. The situation can be quite a mess, and is unfortunately a common scenario in many enterprises.

Each site has unique needs

Acquia strategy product vision

Most of these sites are vastly different in terms of scale, functionality, complexity and longevity. Some sites are under continuous development while other sites are only around for a couple of weeks or months. Some of the websites are owned by the company's IT department and hosted internally, while other websites may be owned by their marketing department and hosted externally. As a result, the level of investment and the time to market requirements are usually very different.

Standardize on Drupal to save costs

Acquia strategy product vision

CIOs – facing cost-cutting pressures and the need to streamline their resources – are now addressing the reality of running twenty different content management systems on twenty different stack configurations as an expensive, unnecessary burden for the organization. They have always known that there were cost savings to be made if they standardize on a single platform, but have never felt the confidence in a single platform to suit all of their needs across their organization.

Drupal has the required features to accomplish this today. This is more than a vision – it is reality. Every day, more organizations are standardizing on Drupal.

By standardizing on Drupal, organizations can reduce training costs, reduce maintenance costs, streamline security, and optimize internal resources – all without sacrificing quality or requirements. Standardizing on Drupal certainly doesn't mean every single system needs to be Drupal. Even going from 20 different systems to 10 or to 5 different systems still translates to dramatic cost savings. It goes without saying that you need to be smart about what makes sense to standardize on Drupal, and what not to standardize on Drupal. With our vast community of contributors, Drupal continues to become better and better and the feasibility for an organization to standardize on Drupal continues to improve over time.

Acquia strategy product vision

Drupal distributions help adoption

Acquia strategy product vision

Drupal distributions are an important part of helping organizations adopt Drupal. Drupal distributions are complete, ready-to-use solutions built on Drupal. Just install and go.

Drupal Commons is a Drupal distribution for social business software; it provides organizations a complete solution for forming collaborative communities. Similarly, Open Publish is a Drupal distribution optimized for news publishing. Acquia sees expansion of distributions as critically important to the future growth of Drupal. With that, we are acting as a software publishers for these and other distributions developed by partners within the Drupal community; supporting the marketing, promotion, support, and ongoing development of distributions to extend the capability of the companies who have incubated these incredible products.

Add the Acquia Network for support and cloud services

Acquia strategy product vision

To help organizations adopt and standardize on Drupal, we created the Acquia Network to provide a suite of Drupal support, knowledge, and web development and maintenance tools to help build, manage and extend Drupal websites.

The Acquia Network is your connection to a team of Drupal experts, available 24x7, and backed by Acquia's engineering and professional services team. As an Acquia Network subscriber, you can submit help tickets, search our knowledge base and contribute in our subscriber forums.

The Acquia Network also provides you access to a number of cloud-based services. Services like heartbeat monitoring, software update management, and soon to be released integration with New Relic provide visibility into your site's performance and help with site management. Other services, like Acquia Search and Mollom, extend the functional capabilities of your sites.

We are in the middle of a massive redesign of the Acquia Network and many of the services you use through the Acquia Network today (including the Acquia Library, a broad collection of tips, tricks, how-to's, and resources for Drupal developers and site owners). Through the Acquia Network you will soon have the ability to easily access a growing list of third-party services, with many available at no additional charge. We already offer many third-party services (e.g. Mollom for spam filtering, New Relic for application profiling, etc), but we'll soon be opening up the Acquia Network as a ‘service delivery platform' and marketplace for additional services. In the works for release over the next few months are mobile design tools from Mobify, analytics, video services, marketing tools, and more.

Interested in adding your service to the Acquia Network? In the future, we will roll out APIs and infrastructure (e.g. billing) to enable other organizations to deliver their cloud-services to any Drupal site through the Acquia Network.

Add Acquia Hosting, a Drupal Platform-as-a-Service

Acquia strategy product vision

For large websites that require custom code, high availability, on-demand elasticity or release management tools (i.e. staging and production workflows), we recommend Acquia Hosting, our Drupal-platform-as-a-service (Drupal PaaS).

Acquia Hosting is an extension of the Acquia Network, so if you need help scaling your site or debugging a problem, Acquia Client Advisors are always available to help. Through the Acquia Network, we also provide a number of Acquia Hosting specific e-services, including backups, database rollbacks, staging environments, version control for code management, and more.

Going forward you can expect even more developer tools and self-service tools to be added to Acquia Hosting, as well as more critical features for large scale sites, including improved security and code workflow options.

Add Drupal Gardens for rapid micro-site development

Acquia strategy product vision

All sites are different. Not all your organization's website need the scale, functionality, complexity or longevity of your most important websites. A lot of times you have smaller sites that you may want to roll-out quickly, preferably without having to involve IT.

For that, we built Drupal Gardens, a Drupal-as-a-service platform that makes building Drupal websites as simple as point and click. Built on Drupal 7, Drupal Gardens brings the freedom and innovation you expect from open source without having to worry about installing, hosting or upgrading your Drupal site.

Our mission for Drupal Gardens is to allow site builders to go from design to online in minutes instead of days or weeks. To help, we provide an ever-growing library of site templates and themes to start from. We believe it will be the best platform for your smaller sites that complement your primary web properties.

For organizations that need to manage tens, if not hundreds, of small websites, we're building ‘Enterprise Drupal Gardens'. It provides site provisioning, site management, single sign-on, multi-site dashboards and organization wide templates and themes to maintain consistent branding.

Host your own sites, if you prefer

Acquia strategy product vision

One of the biggest advantages of using Open Source software is that there are no limits to how you use the software. Some organizations prefer to host some of their own sites. The Acquia Network is able to plug in into your site, regardless of where it is hosted.

No lock in with "Open SaaS"

Acquia strategy product vision

Almost all Software as a Service (SaaS) providers employ a proprietary model – they might allow you to export your data, but they usually don't allow you to export the underlying code. Users of Drupal Gardens are able to export their Drupal Gardens site – the code, the theme and data – and move of the platform to any Drupal hosting environment. By doing so, we provide people an easy on-ramp but we allow them to grow beyond the capabilities of Drupal Gardens without locking them in.

We call this "Open SaaS" or Software as a Service done right based on Open Source principles – it offers a much more secure and low-cost alternative to proprietary counterparts.


I've highlighted some of our key products and services in this blog post and will bring you a more detailed white paper focusing on Acquia's vision. Stay tuned!

Drupal benefits from venture capital

Things are heating up in the Drupal world as both CommerceGuys and SubHub raised venture capital money. We're still waiting for an official announcement, but word on the street is that CommerceGuys raised around 1 million euros to develop a number of e-commerce products and services for Drupal. SubHub raised more than 1.2 million euros to date to develop SubHubLite, a hosted service for Drupal 7 comparable to Drupal Gardens and Buzzr. In addition to CommerceGuys and SubHub, I know of at least two other Drupal companies that are in the process of raising money from investors ...

Selling a product has more upside potential than selling consulting and professional services which you can only bill by the hour. However, it is difficult to bootstrap a product based business without a major investment of funds -- usually from outside investors. I've seen many try and fail. In almost all cases, it failed because the company was under-capitalized. It takes a lot of resources to create a successful and defensible product. Furthermore, people tend to forget about sales and marketing. It's not enough to build your product -- you have to bring it to market as well. That is not trivial either.

I know bootstrapping is hard because I'm bootstrapping Mollom. I know building a product is hard because every day at Acquia, I see how much time and effort goes into our different products.

I don't have a rich uncle, so I would not have been able to co-found Acquia without venture capital financing. We decided that we wanted to focus on being a support and software product company with a strong partner eco-system. Starting Acquia wasn't the easiest route for me, but looking back at the past three years of Acquia, I believe that I made the right decision. Based on how much Acquia has contributed to Drupal and what it has enabled me to do, I like to believe it would have been a loss if I had taken a more conventional route -- or had I decided to continue to work on Drupal as a hobby project.

It's refreshing to see that more and more Drupal companies aspire to become successful product companies and that they are seeking venture capital. I always admired the Ruby on Rails community for its seemingly entrepreneurial attitude. I'm glad to see more of it in the Drupal community as well. There is a good deal of fear surrounding venture capitalists but if Drupal is going to grow, we should expect to see more venture-backed companies building Drupal products. Venture capital financing can be good, especially if these companies give back to Drupal and if they build products and services that make our life easier. We all benefit from that.


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