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Acquia drops non-compete clauses

In a world where innovation is only accelerating, shackling employees with non-competes doesn't make sense anymore. At Acquia, we believe that innovation is about openness and collaboration, and that working together is based on trust and loyalty, something that was born out of our Open Source background. It's been a long time coming but we decided to kill our non-competes. It is the right thing to do. Here is what we just sent to all Acquia employees:

From: Tom Erickson <>
To: Everybody at Acquia
Date: Friday, May 2, 2014


We have an amazing team, it's the thing I am personally proudest about.  
When asked by others what's the best thing about our company, I don't
hesitate to answer "our team".

There are many things to value in each of you, from your commitment, 
your integrity and certainly your passion!

The goal that Dries and I have always set was to have a company where
everyone is challenged, has the opportunity to grow and has some fun
along the way.  Most of the time we're successful at that as a company, 
though sometimes we fail.  Yet even when we fail, we want everyone to 
continue to do the right thing and sustain mutual respect.

To this end, the exec team has decided to eliminate non-competes from 
our employment agreements.   We believe its the right thing for our 
team members, for the company and for the industry.  There are many 
reasons why companies have used non-competes in the past, but we 
believe that times have changed and individuals today value the 
companies who value them.  This may seem contradictory .. "value me, 
but let me go to a competitor" .. but we believe that a company who 
respects our team members in this way will actually be a better magnet 
for talent.

While we are getting rid of non-competes, we are not eliminating other
terms, notably the non-disclosure.  So while we do not want to restrict 
free movement of talent, it's important that company confidential 
information remains just that, confidential.  

We do not plan to change existing employment agreements, as that would 
be an administrative burden, and we have many other issues to deal with.
This email should suffice as an assurance that existing non competes 
below the executive leadership level will not be enforced.  

All new hires, with certain exceptions at the executive level, will not
have non-competes.  

Viva Acquia!

Entrepreneurship is 80% sales and marketing

Background in business is a 'nice to have', not a 'must have' for an aspiring entrepreneur. I had no solid business background when I founded Mollom or Acquia (I launched them roughly at the same time).

Other than the standard things (an idea, passion and the willingness to act), the most important thing that aspiring entrepreneurs need is the understanding that 80% of entrepreneurship is sales and marketing. If as a founder, you're not obsessed with sales and marketing, you're a liability rather than an asset.

You don't have to be the best sales and marketing guy (I am far from that), but you better enjoy getting other people excited about your project, company or product. It will help you not only with finding customers, but also with recruiting a world-class team, raising venture capital, and more. So if there is one thing you should learn before starting a company, it is "sales and marketing" (in the broad sense) — and you better be passionate about it, because you'll invest years of your life to selling and evangelizing to make your company a success. Without customers or a team, you won't need any other skills, because you'll be out of business.

You need to be talking about your idea all the time. Too many entrepreneurs believe that if they build a killer product, customers will come. It almost never works like that. Smart entrepreneurs do it backwards; they find customers first and build their product only when they have customers ready to start paying. Not testing the market by selling from day one can lead to months, if not years, of wasted time and money. So stop being so secretive about your idea. You will never find your product-market fit by keeping your idea secret until it is perfect. If you're afraid of people telling you that your idea is stupid, chances are you may not be ready to be an entrepreneur.

Do well and do good

This blog post is on purpose, Open Source, profit and pie. This week I had an opportunity to meet Professor Klaus Schwab, Founder and Executive Chairman of the World Economic Forum. I was inspired by the following comment he made (not his exact words):

"Because companies strive to have a positive balance sheet, they take more in, than they give out. However, as individuals, we define success as giving more than you take. Given that many of us are leaders as individuals *and* also leaders in our businesses, we often wrestle with these opposing forces. Therein lies the leadership challenge."

I’ve seen many Open Source developers struggle with this as they are inherently wired to give back more than they take. Open Source developers often distrust businesses, sometimes including their own employer, because they take more than they give back. They believe businesses just act out of greed and self-interest.

This kind of corporate distrust comes from the “fixed-pie concept"; that there is only so much work or resources to go around, and as pieces of the pie are taken by some, there is less left for everyone else. The reality is that businesses are often focused on expanding the pie. As the pie grows, there is more for everyone. It is those who believe in the "expanding-pie concept" who can balance the opposing forces. It is those who believe in the "fixed-pie concept" who worry about their own self-interests and distrust businesses.

Imagine a business that is born out of a desire to improve the world, that delivers real value to everyone it touches. A business that makes employees proud and where team members are passionate and committed. A business that aspires to do more than just turn a profit. A business that wants to help fuel a force of good. That is Acquia for me. That should be your employer for you (whoever your employer is).

The myth that profit maximization is the sole purpose of business is outdated, yet so many people seem to hold on to it. I started Acquia because I believed in the potential and transformative nature of Drupal and Open Source. The purpose of business is to improve our lives and create value for all stakeholders.

Acquia's growth and capital position has given me power and responsibility. Power and responsibility that has enabled me to give back more and grow the pie. I have seen the power that businesses have to improve the world by accelerating the power of good, even if they have to take more than they give. It's a story worth telling because business is not a zero-sum game with one winner. I believe Open Source companies are in a prime position to balance the opposing forces. We can do well and do good.

Acquia certification for Drupal

I'm proud to share that Acquia announced its certification program today. You can now get "Acquia certified in Drupal", something I'm pretty excited about.

This is something I've been hoping to see in the community. While there have been other experiments around certification, we as a community have lacked a way to ensure professional standards across Drupal. Over the years, I've heard the demand coming from partners and clients who need a way to evaluate the skills of people on their teams. More and more, that demand has drowned out any perceived criticisms of a certification for Drupal.

A good certification is not just a rubber stamp, but a way for people to evaluate their own abilities, and make plans for improving their knowledge. In some countries, certification is really important to create a career path (something I learned when visiting India). For these reasons, I feel Drupal's growth and development has been hindered without a formal certification in place.

The certification we've built is based on the combined years of experience among Acquia staff who oversee and manage thousands of Drupal sites. We've observed patterns in errors and mistakes; we know what works and what doesn't.

People have debated the pros and cons of software certifications for years (including myself), especially where it involves evaluating candidates for hire. Certainly no certification can be used in isolation; it cannot be used to evaluate a candidate's ability to perform a job well, to work in teams or to learn quickly. Certification can, however, provide a valuable data point for recruiters, and a way for developers to demonstrate their knowledge and stand out. It is undeniably valuable for people who are early in their Drupal career; being certified increases their chance to find a great Drupal job opportunity.

One of the biggest challenges for Drupal adoption has been the struggle to find qualified staff to join projects. Certification will be helpful to recruiters who require that job candidates have a good understanding of Drupal. There are many other aspects to recruitment for which certification does not provide a substitute; it is only one piece of the puzzle. However, It will provide organizations added confidence when hiring Drupal talent. This will encourage the adoption of Drupal, which in turn will grow the Drupal project.

The community has been talking about this need for a long time. One approach, Certified to Rock, evaluated an individual's participation and contribution in the Drupal community. Acquia's certification is different because we're assessing Drupal problem-solving skills. But the community needs more assessments and qualifications. I hope to see other providers come into this space.

Announcing Acquia Lift

Today, the web is not just about publishing content anymore. As the web evolves from content management to digital experience management, it's about understanding visitors' interests and preferences, and figuring out how to deliver them an optimal personalized experience. Many organizations are exploring ways to more effectively create and deliver valuable content to site visitors to increase traffic, conversions and revenue. Great content is still gold, but delivering the right content to the right user at the right moment in the right format is platinum.

Today's personalization tools aren't great and put marketers at a disadvantage. This is why I'm excited to announce that we're rolling out Acquia Lift, a solution that equips the site owners with powerful website testing and content targeting tools to optimize content for each visitor. Acquia Lift learns about a visitor's interests and, based on these insights, uses machine learning algorithms to automate the delivery of personalized content. Marketers and site builders can test content, for example using A/B or multivariate testing, and even add rules about the types of user profiles that get specific content. There is implicit learning that takes place as well that continuously helps Acquia Lift provide increasingly more appropriate content to individuals. Attributes of the user, such as location, and even what the current weather is, can be taken into account in providing the right content. Check out this short Acquia Lift video if you want to learn more or see Acquia Lift in action:

As I talked and wrote about earlier, I believe personalization and contextualization will be a critical building block of the future of the web, and I'm excited to help make that a reality.


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