I bought some Bitcoin and here is why

Over the past twelve months, I’ve become a bit of an obsessive follower of Bitcoin. It started after I read Satoshi Nakamoto’s original Bitcoin paper. It was a fascinating read and my first introduction to crypto-currencies. I even had a couple of lunches in Boston with Gavin Andresen, Bitcoin’s current project lead.

I was close to buying some Bitcoin when I first got interested, but backed off. It was too bad because Bitcoin's value increased from $13 a year ago to around $1,000 at the time wrote this: a 4,000% increase in 12 months. I didn't buy my first Bitcoins until a month ago. I bought them with some reluctance but I figured that people felt a certain reluctance when paper money first came along. But I bought them because to me it seemed like Bitcoin could work and also because I wanted to have a better understanding of what it was all about.

Bitcoin is a purely digital currency. There are no records of Satoshi's identity so no one knows who invented it, no one controls it and it is not backed by gold. It is something akin to a digital version of gold. It's fascinating. At the core of the Bitcoin system is a global, public log, called the "blockchain", that records all transactions between Bitcoin clients. A user can send Bitcoins to another user by forming a transaction and committing it to the blockchain. The blockchain is maintained not by a central body, like a central bank, but by a distributed network of computers, called "miners". Everyone can be a miner, and the miners collectively record and verify all transactions.

Compared to traditional banks, the advantages of Bitcoin are significant. Bitcoin payments can be made at any day of the week, any time of day to anywhere in the world. The fees and delays involved are small compared to those imposed by banks; pennies compared to dollars and minutes compared to days. And unlike paper money, it is unforgeable. Unlike gold, its supply is perfectly verifiable. It is also immune to inflation: governments can't print more Bitcoins to pay off their debts.

The design and architecture of Bitcoin is both a curse and a blessing. The lack of central authority governing Bitcoin raises questions. Governments tend to enjoy power of observation; it makes it easier to fight money laundering, tax evasion and other crimes. As Bitcoin continues to gain popularity, governments may grow increasingly resistant and attempt to shut down Bitcoin. And banks don't like Bitcoin either. Money transfer is an important part of their business; it has almost zero risk, almost zero cost, yet provides them billions of dollars in revenue. In a world where Bitcoin is universally accepted, banks may have a diminished role.

The jury is out on whether Bitcoin is a fantasy destined for failure, or whether Bitcoin will underpin the future of finance. Some predict the value of one Bitcoin could climb to hundreds of thousands of dollars if it becomes universally accepted. While I risk losing some money, it could also turn out to be a massive investment home-run. I felt that the risk/reward decision made it a bet worth taking.

I certainly don't advise you to buy Bitcoin as I'm skeptical that Bitcoin will succeed. I predict Bitcoin to have an extremely bumpy ride, and at best, to follow Gartner's hype cycle. If Bitcoin ends up collapsing, I will be disappointed but I won't feel stupid. I already sold some Bitcoin and recouped my original investment; I'm long with my remaining Bitcoin.

So is Bitcoin a case of speculative greed, or a utopian cyber-libertarian ideology? In a world where everything is going digital, why not currencies? Bitcoin makes it faster, cheaper and easier to store and transport value. It was designed to overcome problems faced with traditional currencies and banks. At a minimum, Bitcoin has created a lot of debate throughout the world, and has shaken a stagnant banking market. Longer term, the concept of a crypto-currency makes a lot of sense to me. It is massively beneficial for the world that we can transfer money easier, faster and cheaper. I find it hard to believe that a hundred years from now, we'd still be digging up gold, and that we wouldn't have a global, digital currency to replace it.

If you believe a digital currency is the future of money, I'll leave you with one question: how would one launch a world-wide crypto-currency like Bitcoin? It can't be owned by a commercial organization, and I simply can't imagine all the world's governments work together to build and launch something like this. Creative disruption often comes from the outside, and not from the inside. It pretty much has to happen in a grassroots way, not unlike the way the Internet was created. Even today after 30 years, the Internet operates without a central governing body and is comprised of independent, voluntarily networks. It works well and changed the world.

The blog post above is a Dutch opinion piece I wrote for the Belgian financial newspaper De Tijd.

Drupal: web accessibility to the core

For the International Day of People with Disabilities (IDPwD) today on December 3rd, I want to take some time to reflect on the Drupal community’s work to support universal access to information technology. Drupal is an inclusive community, both in how we interact with each other and in the results of our work.

We understand the need to create software that is accessible, both for consumption and production of content. Our accessibility statement opens by saying:

As an inclusive community, we are committed to making sure that Drupal is an accessible tool for building websites that can also be accessed by people with disabilities.

Donna Benjamin and Jesse Beach wrote a great overview of the accessibility improvements efforts in Drupal 8. It will meet higher standards of access than our previous releases. As developers and site builders, we continue to incorporate new techniques and access technologies into Drupal. Accessibility to the core.

As a community, we're proud and thankful for the efforts of all those who have contributed time and energy writing, reviewing and testing patches aimed at improving the accessibility of Drupal. There is much work still to do. If you are able, please join the accessibility effort to make sure our next version is our best yet. Thank you!

Thirty-five

I'm turning 35 today. 35 is a weird age. It feels like a milestone birthday; like I'm turning the corner into adulthood for good. Turning 35, it seems, is not without complications. I feel like I became part of the old folk whose cool is threatened by youngsters. Anxious, as I've so much left to achieve and experience.

And yet, I am following my passions and there is not much more I'd want. People have asked me what I'd like for my birthday. I'd love it if you gave me one of the following two things:

  1. Give me the gift of a patch. I'd love to see Drupal 8 come to fruition while I'm 35. Drupal 8 will help make a meaningful difference in the world.
  2. Give a donation to Drupal's Movember team to help fight prostate and testicular cancer. Cancer is a murderer, and I'd like to see it go away.

How Acquia plans to give back to Drupal 8 in Q4

People wonder what we do at Acquia's Office of the CTO (OCTO). In order to provide some more transparency, I wanted to share how we plan to give back between today and the end of the year.

Drupal 8 beta 1

Now that we're forgoing an upgrade path for a migration path, we need to redefine the release criteria for 'beta 1'. We also need to track the issues that block beta in order to help escalate the most critical of the critical issues. We will work with the Drupal 8 core maintainers to define and communicate these criteria, and help with timely patch reviews and issue management for beta-blocking issues.

Migrate module in core

As a co-author of the Migrate module, Moshe will be assisting the core development team on the goal to get Migrate module functionality into core and support a Drupal 6 to Drupal 8, as well as the Drupal 7 to Drupal 8 migration path.

Improve the Drupal 8 developer experience

We want developers to be productive and enjoy writing Drupal 8 modules, so we will be fleshing out the D8DX battleplan based on discussions at DrupalCon Prague, and working with others in the Drupal community to ensure that we fix the most important developer experience problems in preparation of Drupal 8's release.

Develop learning resources

We will be working on a central resource on Drupal.org for developers to find the information they need in order to port their modules to Drupal 8, including documentation, tools, and other resources.

Evaluate semantic versioning

There was a lot of talk at DrupalCon Prague about lessons learned in Drupal 7 and 8 and how to do better in the future. One such area of improvement is a release strategy that allows for iterative innovation in Drupal core every few months. We plan to work with other community leaders and the Drupal security team in order to come up with a strategy around this. A component of this strategy may be to adopt semantic versioning.

Improve Drupal 8 performance

We will also dedicate the OCTO team's time to help the Drupal core community identify and fix some major performance issues in Drupal core.

Authoring experience improvements

Major development efforts on the UX features the Spark team helped get into Drupal 8 core—WYSIWYG, in-place editing, mobile-friendly toolbar —are winding down. We still have work to do on fixing up some loose ends, and are committed to see this through. We will also backport the major Spark modules to Drupal 7.

Communicate Drupal 8 progress

We aim to continue the weekly D8 progress reports that you can find at This Week In Core, and are actively seeking other core developers to help get these important posts out.

A drop in an ocean

We're a handful of contributors in the OCTO and can only do so much. We will continue doing these things within a community of hundreds of other contributors and supporting their work in other ways. We're looking forward to much Drupal 8 progress in the next 3 months!

To start an Open Source project or not?

People ask me what it is like to be the head of a big Open Source project, and whether they should Open Source their project or not. I wanted to talk about that a bit more in this blog post so more people can pick up my answer.

Having been the project lead of the Drupal project for the past 13 years, I’ve watched my dorm-room activity transform into a community filled with passionate people all working toward the same goal: changing the world and making it a better place through open source.

Today Drupal powers more than 1.5 million sites. Drupal is a source of innovation for business and government. Most importantly, Drupal has helped individuals build a dream, giving smaller groups and organizations a bigger voice, as tools are democratized. But it has also allowed large businesses to develop new ideas, bring and build transformative experiences to the digital world.

The ambitious individuals who would lead the next generation of open source projects will experience moments of joy and excitement. It's exhilarating when your passion drives you to help create solutions to challenging problems. Your joy will be tempered with plenty of moments of frustration and doubt, as roadblocks may stand in your way during crucial points of development. But the successful leaders will be the ones who aren’t dissuaded from their work.

Creating a successful open source project requires much more work than writing good code. If your project is growing, then one day you'll start to see that you are a leader. You’re creating a vision, a culture, and inspiring people to come on board. This evangelism requires a lot of travel, conferences, fundraising, people management, project management and more. Make sure this passion is also within you.

I’ve had the opportunity to travel the world, evangelizing Drupal and have a leading role in a passionate, active community that is making a real difference. I’ve also founded a non-profit organization and a commercial company on that same promise.

As you start to build a community of participants who are willing to commit their time and passion to your project, you’ll soon realize that in life, the luckiest people in the world are those driven by the desire to be a part of something great. When you work in open source, you’ll be surrounded by people like these. Knowing you help make a difference and that hundreds of thousands of people depend on your project, helps you make sense of your commitment. So even on a bad day, it's still exciting.

The world would certainly benefit from having more Open Source, but its not a small undertaking as others come to depend on it. Only you can decide whether you have what it takes. When I started Drupal, I didn't really understand what I was getting myself into. It has been a lot of work, but knowing what I know today, I'd do it again. In a heartbeat.

State of Drupal presentation (September 2013)

Last week in Prague, I gave my traditional State of Drupal presentation. A total of 1,830 Drupalists were present at DrupalCon, a new record for our European DrupalCon!

In good tradition, you can download a copy of my slides (PDF, 31 MB) or you can watch a video recording of my keynote. The keynote starts at 11:42, but don't miss out on the singing carrots introduction. A video recording of the keynote is embedded in this post.

Moeke Hasselt

Liefste Moeke Hasselt,

Vandaag is het een vreemde dag. Ik kan helaas niet bij je zijn maar ik denk aan jou en deel de pijn.

Ik denk terug aan de liefde die je ons hebt gegeven. Met goedheid en lieve zorgen heb je ons omringd.

Kon ik nog maar een keer goed met je praten, of kon ik je maar laten zien hoe ik mijn leven zou gaan leiden.

Maar vrees niet, want je hebt ons een erg goed voorbeeld gegeven. Je was een vrouw met een groot besef van plicht. Bedachtzaam, bescheiden en tevreden -- die dingen staan nu ook in ons hart en in ons verstand geschreven.

Vandaag is het een vreemde dag. Verdrietig om het gemis, dankbaar voor de goede herinneringen, en trots op wat je ons hebt gegeven.

Moeke Hasselt, geniet van je rust, verlost van alle pijn, en van eindelijk bij Vake Hasselt te zijn.

Bedankt,

Je kleinzoon, Dries

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