Open Source and social capital

The notion that people contributing to Open Source don't get paid is false. Contributors to Open Source are compensated for their labor; not always with financial capital (i.e. a paycheck) but certainly with social capital. Social capital is a rather vague and intangible concept so let me give some examples. If you know someone at a company where you are applying for a job and this connection helps you get that job, you have used social capital. Or if you got a lead or a business opportunity through your network, you have used social capital. Or when you fall on hard times and you rely on friends for emotional support, you're also using social capital.

The term "social" refers to the fact that the value is in the network of relationships; they can't be owned like personal assets. Too many people believe that success in life is based on the individual, and that if you do not have success in life, there is no one to blame but yourself. The truth is that individuals who build and use social capital get better jobs, better pay, faster promotions and are more effective compared to peers who are not tapping the power of social capital. As shown in the examples, social capital also translates into happiness and well-being.

Most Open Source contributors benefit from social capital but may not have stopped to think about it, or may not value it appropriately. Most of us in the Open Source world have made friendships for life, have landed jobs because of our contributions, others have started businesses together, and for others it has provided an important sense of purpose. Once you become attuned to spotting social capital being leveraged, you see it everywhere, every day. I could literally write a book filled with hundreds of stories about how contributing to Open Source changed people's lives -- I love hearing these stories.

Social capital is a big deal; it is worth understanding, worth talking about, and worth investing in. It is key to achieving personal success, business success and even happiness.

To bean or not to bean?

Last weekend our Nespresso machine died in front of my eyes. Water started leaking from its base during use and it shorted the electricity. It was a painful death. I'm tempted to take it apart and try to repair it but it also brings up the question; what to buy next?

Part of me enjoys the convenience of the Nespresso machine, the other part of me is eager to buy my first "serious" espresso machine.

See, I'm a coffee lover. That is to say, like most of the people living in the US I have a coffee addiction, and have been brainwashed into spending more and more on my daily coffee intake. To make matters worse, we live in a society where we call the people who make great coffee "artists". I'd love to practice some coffee artistry myself and make that perfect barista-grade cup of coffee.

I did a little bit of research and picking an espresso machine is not easy. It turns out this is a complex space. The choices range from super-automatic machines (e.g. they do everything from grinding, dosing, tamping to brewing) to semi-automatic machines (e.g. you manually grind your own beans and tamp them) to manual machines (e.g. you control how long the brewing water sits over the bed of coffee, resting as it were at neutral or boiler pressure). There are even "coffee schools" that offer classes and certifications to become a professional barista.

While I love the smell of fresh ground coffee and an above perfection espresso, I also don't want to take 15 minutes to make a cup of coffee. I usually need my first cup of coffee to help me wake up and I'm often crunched for time, so I don't want it to be super complicated.

Espresso or Nespresso? To bean or not to bean? Help!

Drupal.com refresh launched

Back in the early days of Drupal, Drupal.com looked like this:

Drupal.com in 2005

Drupal.com as launched in 2005.

On August 14 2009, I relaunched Drupal.com to replace the oh-so-embarrassing placeholder page. The 2009 re-launch turned Drupal.com into a better spotlight for Drupal. It wasn't hard to beat the white page with a Druplicon logo.

Drupal.com in 2009

Drupal.com as launched in 2009.

What was a good spotlight five years ago though is no longer a good spotlight today. Five years later, Drupal.com didn't do Drupal justice. It didn't really explain what Drupal is, what you can use Drupal for, and more. Along with sub-optimal content, the site wasn't optimized for mobile use either.

Today, exactly five years later to the day, I'm excited to announce that I relaunched Drupal.com again:

Drupal com devices

Redesigning Drupal.com to make it more useful and current has been one of my New Year's resolutions for a number of years now. And as of today, I can finally strike that off my list.

The new Drupal.com has become richer in its content; you'll find a bit more information about Drupal to help people understand what Drupal is all about and how to get started with Drupal. On a desktop, on a tablet, on a phone, the site has become much easier to navigate and read.

I believe the new Drupal.com is a much better, more relevant showcase for Drupal. The goal is to update the site more regularly and to keep adding to it. My next step is to add more use cases and to include short demo videos of both the Drupal backend as well as the showcases. Drupal.com will become an increasingly helpful resource and starting point for people who are evaluating Drupal.

Drupal com mobile

The changes are not limited to content and look; Drupal.com also has a new engine as the site was upgraded from Drupal 6 to Drupal 8 alpha (don't try this at home). We're using Drupal 8 to push the boundaries of site building and responsive design and to uncover bugs and usability issues with Drupal 8. Because we're using an alpha version of Drupal 8, things might not function perfectly yet. We’d still love to hear feedback from designers and front end developers on how it’s working.

Amazon invests in Acquia

I'm happy to share news that Amazon has joined the Acquia family as our newest investor. This investment builds on the recent $50 million financing round that Acquia completed in May, which was led by New Enterprise Associates (NEA).

Acquia is the largest provider of Drupal infrastructure in the world. We run on more than 8,000 AWS instances and serve more than 27 billion hits a month or 333 TB of bandwidth a month. Working with AWS has been an invaluable part of our success story, and today's investment will further solidify our collaboration.

We did not disclose the amount of the investment in today's news announcement.

Help me write my DrupalCon Amsterdam keynote

For my DrupalCon Amsterdam keynote, I want to try something slightly different. Instead of coming up with the talk track myself, I want to "crowdsource" it. In other words, I want the wider Drupal community to have direct input on the content of the keynote. I feel this will provide a great opportunity to surface questions and ideas from the people who make Drupal what it is.

In the past, I've done traditional surveys to get input for my keynote and I've also done keynotes that were Q&A from beginning to end. This time, I'd like to try something in between.

I'd love your help to identify the topics of interests (e.g. scaling our community, future of the web, information about Drupal's competitors, "headless" Drupal, the Drupal Association, the business of Open Source, sustaining core development, etc). You can make your suggestions in the comments of this blog post or on Twitter (tag them with @Dries and #driesnote). I'll handpick some topics from all the suggestions, largely based on popularity but also based on how important and meaty I think the topic is.

Then, in the lead-up to the event, I'll create discussion opportunities on some or all of the topics so we can dive deeper on them together, and surface various opinions and ideas. The result of those deeper conversations will form the basis of my DrupalCon Amsterdam keynote.

So what would you like me to talk about? Suggest your topics in the comments of this blog post or on Twitter by tagging your suggestions with #driesnote and/or @Dries. Thank you!

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