Managing comments on multiple WordPress sites

There is a pursuit we all share; not having to deal with spammers. The promise of a clean spam-free web.

With that in mind, I'm pleased to announce that we released a new version of the Mollom plugin for WordPress. Mollom is an anti-spam solution for websites that offers some unique features not available in other solutions like Akismet. For example, the new Mollom plugin for WordPress ships with complete support for the Mollom Content Moderation Platform — enabling you to moderate all of your WordPress sites from a single unified interface.

This is a great feature for organizations that have many sites. If you have 20 WordPress sites and 10 Drupal sites, you can now moderate these sites from a single user interface that offers powerful moderation workflows.

The new WordPress plugin leverages Mollom's PHP library that implements Mollom REST API. The library is the basis for the Mollom module for Drupal but was designed to be reused by other systems. If you have a content management system other than Drupal or WordPress, you can also connect it with the Mollom Content Moderation Platform.

Give it a try! You may like it.

Chris Cornell - Black hole sun

A song that is both sad and pretty, sung with the voice of a god. To me, it is about how it is really difficult for a person to create their own life and their own freedom.

Drupal 8 API freeze

July 1st has arrived. As announced earlier, this marks the start of the Drupal 8 API freeze (formerly known as the "code freeze"). I'm very excited about how Drupal 8 is shaping up; it will be a much more powerful and easier to use Drupal. While there is a lot of work ahead of us, I feel good about moving forward with the next phase of the Drupal 8 development cycle.

The two main goals of the "API freeze" are (a) to resolve release-blocking issues known as "critical bugs" and "critical tasks" and (b) to provide developers with a stable API to port their modules from Drupal 7 to Drupal 8. This means that during the API freeze we will no longer make backwards compatibility-breaking changes to public APIs except when deemed that it is necessary to resolve important bugs or where the API has already been deprecated. Changes that do not break backwards compatibility are still allowed, including API additions, at the maintainers' discretion.

During this API freeze, we're also going to do a few things differently than we did with previous release cycles. I'll explain each of those changes below.

Deprecating Drupal 7 APIs

Currently, Drupal 8 includes backwards compatibility layers that support Drupal 7 APIs while we complete conversions of core modules to the new Drupal 8 APIs. An example is the routing support in hook_menu(), which will replaced by the Drupal 8 routing system. The Drupal 7 APIs are being marked deprecated in phpDoc, and contributed module developers should not use them because they will be removed prior to the Drupal 8 release.

Deprecating Drupal 8 APIs

When appropriate, maintainers can still add new APIs to Drupal 8 that deprecate existing APIs. In this case, the deprecated APIs will continue to be supported and not be removed until Drupal 9. This is to avoid breaking contributed modules that have been upgraded to Drupal 8 already.

Adding stand-alone features

A certain class of features may get committed despite being over our commit thresholds. The main criteria are that these features have to be self contained (no follow-up tasks) and easy to roll back (limited inter-module dependencies). If a single critical or major is filed as a result of these commits, we will favour rollback over going forward. As a result, these kind of features should have almost no impact on the rest of core development, nor introduce technical debt.

The road to the first beta

During the API freeze, we will also switch from publishing alpha releases to beta releases. This will happen when there are no known critical bugs in the upgrade path from the last Drupal 7 release.

Between API freeze and beta 1, removing temporary backward compatibility layers and deprecated Drupal 7 functions is allowed and encouraged. After beta 1, we get more strict about backward compatibility breaks (temporary backward compatibility layers and deprecated functions not removed by then might not be eligible for removal any more).

Summary

After more than 2 years of non-stop work, it is pretty exciting to enter API freeze. It is a big milestone for all of us. Frankly, Drupal 8 will be our best release ever, by far, and I can't wait to get it in your hands. But we can't get Drupal 8 released without you. Please take a moment of your time to download and try out the alpha releases. If you are a module developer, make sure the things that are important to you are working, and working well so you can start upgrading your modules the day we start releasing betas. If you find a problem, please report it. Every bug you uncover is a chance to improve the experience for millions of users. Thank you, and we hope to see you in the issue queues!

Drupal 8 alpha releases

A month ago we started the Drupal 8 alpha cycle to encourage module developers to test out Drupal 8 and to try upgrading their modules. Today, we published the second alpha release of Drupal 8: Drupal 8.x alpha 2!

I think it is exciting that after years of hard work by many, we have now begun to post alpha releases.

The purpose of alpha releases is to allow module developers to identify API deficiencies while they can still be corrected. We want Drupal's API to be easy to learn, easy to use (even without documentation), hard to misuse, easy to read and maintain, and easy to extend. Good API design really matters and we only have one chance to get it right so please download the alpha release, try upgrading some contributed modules, and provide us feedback along with suggestions for improvement.

Time is of the essence as API changes to Drupal 8 are only allowed for a little longer. We're about to enter the polish phase of the Drupal 8 development cycle, where we will soon switch to beta releases and no longer allow API changes unless needed to fix release blocking issues. From then on, most API improvements will have to wait until Drupal 9.

Passive income and Open Source

Everyone dreams of making money while asleep. The term "passive income" is often defined as income that is received on regular intervals without requiring a great deal of work to sustain it. Usually some effort has to be put in upfront, but the payoff from passive income can last for years. Passive income is particularly relevant when it comes time to retire. Two techniques often recommended by financial planners are (a) rental properties and (b) dividend investing. Both can work well, not only as a retirement plan, but as a way to build steady income. Certainly the idea of collecting checks for the rest of your life with minimal effort sounds appealing.

Quite a few people that try to retire early are documenting their journey publicly. For example, Jason is trying to retire by 40 by investing in dividend growth stocks and Mr. Money Mustache retired at the age of 30 through rental properties. Many other great examples exist online; I love reading up on their stories and progress. There is a lot to like about their lifestyle too; a common theme among them is that they live frugally.

So what does this have to do with Open Source? I love Open Source and Drupal and would like to see even more contributors. I think a lot of developers would love passive income so they have the freedom to contribute to Open Source more, preferably even full-time. Many developers also live a frugal life; passive income may be a good option to explore. But also, what about a third passive income technique: (c) websites? I know several people who have a number of websites, some of which they haven't touched for months, yet they still bring in around $500 a month. Owning a few websites could provide a wonderful chance to earn passive income, and it so happens that many of us in the Drupal community have a talent for building websites ... Food for thought.

Growth of Acquia Cloud

It's been a while since I wrote about Acquia Cloud so I wanted to give you a quick update. Acquia Cloud has experienced incredible growth so far in 2013. We recently crossed a milestone that I'm proud to share; we’re now running over 6,000 cloud instances on behalf of our customers in six Amazon regions stretching across North America, Europe, Asia and Australia. These instances are used to run a wide variety of Drupal sites; from e-commerce to collaboration to marketing sites, and more.

All that capacity served over 18 billion requests in May, with many more requests served via our CDN partnerships. Compared to last year, Acquia Cloud's traffic is up 200%. We also served over 232 terabytes of data in May. This astounding growth solidifies the scalability of Acquia Cloud. And it's only going to grow faster as Acquia is signing up larger websites.

Acquia cloud may

State of Drupal presentation (May 2013)

Two weeks ago at DrupalCon Portland, I gave my traditional State of Drupal presentation. A total of 3,500 were present at DrupalCon, a new record for DrupalCon attendance.

In good tradition, you can download a copy of my slides (PDF, 29 MB) or you can watch a video recording of my keynote (keynote starts at 14:00). The video of the White House guest appearance and the Drupal 8 demo video area also embedded in this post.

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