Drupal 2010 retrospective and 2011 predictions

This is my first blog post in 2011, so first things first: happy New Year to all of you!

As I do each year, I want to stop for a moment and reflect on the past, before jumping head-first into the new year.

Last year was another year of growth for Drupal: the number of active committers grew; the number of visitors to drupal.org grew; the number of Drupal sites grew; and the number of Drupal events and meet-ups grew. Drupal grew by almost every discernible metric.

Overall, we became a better and more well-rounded team in 2010. We've always had many kick-ass engineers in the Drupal community. However, 2010 was the year in which we achieved noticeably better usability, design, accessibility and marketing. These are important developments, as these new skills will help prepare us for even more success in the long run.

On a personal level, 2010 was a very busy Drupal year for me. I committed 1,683 patches -- that's up from 1,567 patches in 2009 and 1,031 patches in 2008. I accepted many more speaking engagements to evangelize our work. While in 2009 I flew about 100,000 km (62,000 miles), in 2010 I flew over 300,000 km (190,000 miles). That's a lot of evangelizing. I was more 'outward facing' in 2010 than ever before, which seems to be a trend. Although I enjoy meeting Drupal users, I'm glad to stay closely involved with the day to day development of Drupal core. Being able to combine these two essential elements is both important and healthy. I hope and predict that 2011 will bring more of the same.

My two personal Drupal highlights for 2010 include DrupalCon San Francisco with more than 3,000 attendees (and $72,000 USD alone spent on coffee), as well as the launch of the drupal.org redesign.

My personal low for Drupal in 2010 is the fact that we didn't release Drupal 7. It is a consolation, however, it has been delayed for good reasons and we didn't compromise on quality. One thing is a given though: 2011 will be the year of Drupal 7. It will be a nicer-looking, more powerful, and more scalable Drupal that will be easier to use. If you've overlooked Drupal previously in favor of some other system, it's time to revisit it again.

My biggest wish for 2011 is that our community remains strong. We are our biggest asset. We make Drupal both vibrant and innovative. It has been an honor to be a part of the Drupal project, and it remains so today. I have no reason to believe that that will change in 2011.

After working on Drupal 7 for three years, I'm looking forward to start working on Drupal 8. One of the things that I like most is figuring out the future, and leading the community in the right direction.

I'm utterly convinced that user experience remains the single most important thing that is holding back Drupal adoption. I want to spend time listening and talking to each of Drupal's users and learn more about their experiences. That includes content creators, site builders, developers, designers, system administrators, owners of small Drupal sites, owners of large Drupal sites and more. I also want to learn more about other systems and learn from them. There is only so much we can do in one release, especially if we want shorter release schedules. So I want to have a very clear picture of how we can improve the user experience of each of Drupal's target audiences.

Based on the 300,000 km of listening I did last year, I predict that the following three items will make it in the top five new features of Drupal 8: general usability improvements for content creators and site builders; performance improvements for single machine installations; life cycle and release management (e.g., development-staging-production, configuration management, testability).

It's clear that the mobile web will become mainstream in a big way in 2011. On top of that, the iPad is changing our world. We should think long and hard about how we can make Drupal the go-to-platform for building web applications in a world of tablets and mobile handheld devices. One of my objectives is to write a small iPhone or Android application that connects with Drupal. I want to learn more about it so I'm going to try and make it one of my weekend projects.

I also predict that in 2011, we'll see the first Drupal website that serves a billion page views per month, and that Drupal.org will be upgraded to Drupal 7 before the end of 2011.

I've spent a lot of time time thinking about Drupal distributions in 2010. While we made a lot of progress in making distributions feasible from a technical point of view, we have yet to figure out the business model around Drupal distributions. Unless we make it commercially interesting or at least commercially viable for organizations to build and maintain high quality distributions, distributions might not be as popular as we'd like. I think 2011 might be the year where many of us test how important Drupal distributions are really going to be for us.

Looking back at 2010, I'm happy with the way the Drupal Association evolved. We did some unusual things this year. We hired two full-time employees; Megan Sanicki (sponsor wrangler) and Neil Kent (events manager), and paid for the drupal.org redesign to be completed. We're also paying for the migration from CVS to Git. It isn't always easy to mix paid staff into a volunteer-driven open source project, but without that, two of my 2010 highlights would not have happened.

Relative to the bigger market, 2010 was also the year where I felt core development of Joomla! slowed down a bit. As part of that, I noticed that the Joomla community started to expand to Drupal. WordPress, on the other hand, seems to be accelerating. Slowly but certainly, it's growing from a blogging platform into a content management system. Kudos to Matt Mullenweg and Automattic for their progress. While WordPress has a long way to go to compete with Drupal on the high-end, I expect that we will see it compete more and more in the low-end of the market. I won't let them take the low-end of the market -- it has been too important for Drupal's growth and adoption. I'm very passionate about making small sites successful, and I wish they were better represented in the Drupal.org issue queues. It is going to be interesting to see how these things play out. Either way, the real competition is not other Open Source projects, but proprietary software vendors and the many static HTML websites. There is so much room for growth that we shouldn't worry too much about Open Source competition.

2011 is also the year that Drupal turns 10 years old. We're starting off the year with our biggest release ever, followed by our biggest party ever. We'll have lots of things to talk about, lots of planning to do, and lots of initiatives to kick off. Expect 2011 to get very busy.

No blog post of this type would be complete if I didn't end with a sincere, heart-felt "Thank you!" to the many members of our community. Without your contributions, Drupal wouldn't exist, and my past years and future years to come would be devoid of something I love dearly. So, from me to you, for making Drupal what it is today, and for working with me to make it better day by day, let me say, simply, thank you.

Comments

Jeff Eaton (not verified):

"While we made a lot of progress in making distributions feasible from a technical point of view, we have yet to figure out the business model around Drupal distributions. Unless we make it commercially interesting or at least commercially viable for organizations to build and maintain high quality distributions, distributions might not be as popular as we'd like."

An excellent point. I have a strong suspicion that a combination of paid customization, SaaS hosting, and unsupported "roll your own" is the most likely path forward for distros in the Drupal world. I don't think that the technical and the economic aspects can be separated, though. Having built distros in Drupal 5, 6, and now 7, I can say that the investment needed to build and maintain a distribution is directly related to the technical hurdles that lie between a good idea and the finished implementation.

As we make the creation and deployment of Drupal distros less daunting technically, more paths to monetization become realistic.

I'm definitely looking forward to 2011, it promises to be a fascinating year!

January 3, 2011 - 23:49
Jay Batson (not verified):

On the Distro's topic, a couple of other things need worked out relative to how distro's are handled on drupal.org. There are several elements to this:

  • Drupal.org can't build distros that include 3rd-party libraries. This has been a "we're going to enable this" item for a while; but it's not done. And as distros start to be more than "just a website," they will be increasingly likely to include non-Drupal components - which need to be "bundled" in the distribution in order to be simple to install & try. We have this problem (as you know) with Drupal Commons; so we must build at acquia.com and provide the download from there. Until d.o can build distro's with 3rd-party libraries, there will be confusion on how distros are to be handled.
  • Where and how are they marketed? Though in the above item I imply that the distro needs to be built on & downloadable from drupal.org, if a company is going to have a business model around a distribution, it must be easy for organizations (or people) providing product & services related to the distro to get needed visibility on drupal.org to drive inbound sales inquiries. The marketing current situation on drupal.org is sub-optimal for an organization that is considering the non-trivial investment of building, expanding-on, and maintaining a distro.

For people other than Dries, Jeff's comments above on the model are what Acquia is doing with Drupal Commons. But though that model looks correct, it's by no means easy to get right. There's still much detail to figure out on how to get this model to work.

January 4, 2011 - 00:22
Jen Simmons (not verified):

You said:

"I predict that the following three items will make it in the top five new features of Drupal 8: general usability improvements for content creators and site builders; performance improvements for single machine installations; life cycle and release management."

and

"We should think long and hard about how we can make Drupal the go-to-platform for building web applications in a world of tablets and mobile handheld devices."

Then it sounds to me like getting HTML5 application framework support into Drupal 8 should be one of the other top five features.

January 4, 2011 - 00:27
dave (not verified):

i second this emotion - it may be the shortest path to cross-platform deployment on mobile interfaces, instead of just worrying about ipad! i love apple, but not everybody uses apple product...

January 4, 2011 - 19:25
John Keith (not verified):

"It's clear that the mobile web will become mainstream in a big way in 2011. On top of that, the iPad is changing our world. We should think long and hard about how we can make Drupal the go-to-platform for building web applications in a world of tablets and mobile handheld devices. One of my objectives is to write a small iPhone or Android application that connects with Drupal. I want to learn more about it so I'm going to try and make it one of my weekend projects."

This is great to hear! We have been using Drupal for our server-side platform, particularly for serving mobile web content this year, and we're pleased-but-looking-forward-to-doing-more. We've been able to leverage all sorts of Drupal awesome sauce to make things go for our customers, but we still have quite a ways to go.

January 4, 2011 - 01:05
K (not verified):

I hope that, in addition to the things you mentioned, 2011 is the year in which module management is really brought under control. We need clearer workflows, documentation, and training for new module developers on everything from collaboration (not reinventing the wheel) to licensing. We also need a better handle on dealing with module abandonment.

I'd like to see this a big effort this year towards fostering new module maintainers, helping contributed module maintainers also become core contributors, and helping currently overburdened module maintainers ease their load. Basically, I think we have to take an approach of treating most module maintainers like student assistants. They arrive fresh and eager but untrained. A few months in you know if they will make it through for the next couple of years. But, you always know in the back of your mind, that they will eventually be moving on, and someone will be needed to fill in and take their place. A better process for this will help maintain the long-term viability of the development community side of Drupal.

January 4, 2011 - 03:04
Benjamin Melançon (not verified):

Please get involved with the Peer Review group!

January 4, 2011 - 19:21
Olaf (not verified):

"I won't let them take the low-end of the market -- it has been too important for Drupal's growth and adoption."

The big challenge will be to find a way to address the low segment, without alienating the mid and higher end of the market, segments that are seemingly well served by Drupal. Out of curiosity, how is the 'low-end of the market' defined within the community? It's not a homogeneous market and getting the segmentation right is crucial. Are we talking about people that set up a personal site with the help of a one-click installer, about the small business owner that wants a brochureware site, beginning freelancers, etc? How 'low' do we go?

Personally I'm encouraged by the amount of people I know that started using Wordpress and Joomla, were not able to overcome some of the limitations and switched to Drupal and stayed around. You also mentioned this in an article linked above. Yes, the learning curve is steep, but the possibilities so much greater.

Exciting times ahead!

January 4, 2011 - 03:50
Justin Winter (not verified):

I agree wholeheartedly that user experience is the single most important Drupal issue right now. I would like to take that a step further and say that, I believe user experience with regard to media (images, video, slideshows, etc) is one of the most important Drupal issue right now.

Nearly every mobile phone has a 5 megapixel, or greater, video /still camera on board, not to mention the bazillion dollar dedicated digital camera (SLR) market. We live in a imagery rich, visual world and that's only going to get more and more prevalent. I believe that media storage, manipulation, and display demands will continue to grow and drive "low-end" to "medium" web projects. Nearly all of the most memorable web projects our team has worked on over the last many years were driven by imagery and media. As bandwidth and worldwide access to the web continues to increase I think Drupal's media capabilities must become a primary focus.

Sadly Drupal has a pretty bad rap when it comes to dealing with media "out of the box". Core integration of media streams as well as the media module have been a huge step forward and I look forward to contributing and seeing the magic that comes out of that project. However, I think that handling media both from the administrative side and from the theming side still needs to be, and can be, much better. More clients than I can count have compared other CMS tools to Drupal (ex. joomla & wordpress media library) I believe Drupal would quickly take the competitive edge if jquery slideshows, video players, and advanced image handling was better built into core. Integrating the media module and media library into core seems like a "no brainer" going forward to me, and from my opinion, critical to targeting the low end to medium market.

Dries, thanks for all your hard work. You have made a huge difference to how we work and I look forward to the year of drupal 2011.

January 4, 2011 - 05:24
rjstatic (not verified):

Agreed, media content management is a must for low to medium end adoption. From my experience users ask the following questions in this order:

How do I add text? (Drupal 1)
How do I add images? (Drupal 7)
How do I add a movie? (Drupal 8?)
How do I add audio? (Drupal 8?)

Even as a developer who has been working with Drupal for 3+ years I'm still banging my head against the desk to implement a solid way of handling the display of media. Open Standards Media (OSM) Player in the Mediafront module is promising and I'm interested to see what's happening in the Media module. Mediafront still has a ways to go and I hear that the Media module still has a lot of big hurdles to overcome.

Unfortunately I also know content editors who don't consider Drupal a CMS because it doesn't have a WYSIWYG in core... This appears to me to be a barrier to entry (if not a superficial barrier to entry) for low to medium end adoption.

January 4, 2011 - 16:45
Larry Garfield (not verified):

I won't let them take the low-end of the market -- it has been too important for Drupal's growth and adoption.

Bless you sir!

Reclaiming the low end will take a multi-pronged approach. Improved usability is one part of it. Improved performance is another, which at this point will require considerable architectural changes, most of which we need anyway.

Media handling is probably the biggest missing "feature tickbox" in that area. Core's file and media handling is about three times as good in Drupal 7 as it was in Drupal 6... which is still a far far cry from where it needs to be. Media module seemed like it would be a solution but that has basically stalled out and is not progressing in a useful direction. Distributions can deal with WYSIWG, but media handling has to be a core architectural concern.

January 4, 2011 - 07:49
Jacob Singh (not verified):

I agree, both things which I've been passionate about in D7 (update manager and media) are really important ideas to the every(wo)man which are not getting enough oxygen at the moment.

That being said, today's neglected hackfest is tomorrow's killer module, so there is still time to turn that around. Acquia has been working on several large D7 modules (Media, Webform+form builder, Views, etc) for DrupalGardens, and I think in the coming months we'll see even more investment in contrib. There are two reasons for this: 1. Drupal Core is now released and we can relax a bit around massive API changes breaking stuff (I hope). 2. When we take DrupalGardens to market, and people start paying money for it, well, we need the code to be rock solid.

In addition, I'm hoping there will be more interest in Media (and investment) from the large shops since unlike update manager, this is an improvement for all sites, not just the low-end market.

January 5, 2011 - 21:36
Marco (not verified):

Great blog post.

One of the key things for me for Drupal 8 will be the

life cycle and release management (e.g., development-staging-production, configuration management, testability).

This is the one thing which causes me pain every time I need to deploy and manage a new drupal site. If we could nail that with a smooth workflow then there should be no holding back!

January 4, 2011 - 07:50
Lloyd Budd (not verified):

Congratulations Drupal, community and Dries on a fantastic 2010! I'm really excited to see Drupal 7 released and all the other fantastic developments in 2011!

I wonder if there is a better way to frame the competition. It seems a little strange to call out us other open source projects Joomla! and WordPress making a judgement towards both , but then say we should all be singing Kumbaya together and that the real competition are some unnamed proprietary competitors.

Again, keep up the awesome!

January 4, 2011 - 08:00
Dries:

We're often compared with Joomla! or WordPress, but reality is that we're both competing against proprietary competitors. It is somewhat complex.

Maybe I should have stayed away from comparing Drupal with other projects. At the same time, I wanted to capture my thoughts on the bigger market. It is important to see the bigger picture.

Not sure how to frame it differently, but I'll think about it more. I certainly agree that competition might be too strong a word. I have a lot of respect for Joomla! and WordPress -- I meet and chat with Matt Mullenweg regularly.

January 4, 2011 - 08:20
Lloyd Budd (not verified):

Thanks for elaborating! It's a minefield, or mind field ;-)

January 6, 2011 - 01:27
Damien McKenna (not verified):

I think the solution to the low-end site lies in another item you mentioned: distros. We need a "blog" distro that provides a turn-key blog with lots of powerful but basic functionality enabled out of the box, including a solid WYSIWYG editor (inc picking a 3rd party editor to be bundled), and improved media handling. This then in turn depends on two other items: the 3rd party includes that Jay Batson mentioned, and the media handling that Justin Winter mentioned. Of course the concern is avoiding overloading the installation so that it can still run on shared hosts, where many other apps inc Wordpress have a stronger hold on the market.

January 4, 2011 - 08:38
Isaac Sukin (not verified):

Dries, would you (or someone else at Acquia) be interested in a brief interview about "Drupal [distributions] as a product" and how distros will affect enterprise adoption? I'm writing a blog post on that topic for Mediacurrent as a follow-up to my post on Installation Profiles vs. Distributions vs. Features (which you tweeted about -- thanks!).

Personally, I think that the best thing we can do in the short-term to improve the prospects of distributions is to make the documentation on creating them much, much better.

January 4, 2011 - 08:40
AdrianB (not verified):

I'm very passionate about making small sites successful, and I wish they were better represented in the Drupal.org issue queues.

As a builder of small Drupal sites mostly on shared hosting I wish the same thing.

What Drupal badly needs in this segment is better performance (out of the box!). Where WordPress is fast and "zippy" on even the cheapest shared hosting Drupal (with some common modules) is not. This is my biggest concern right now.

This is not about handling enormous amounts of traffic and visitors. These are small sites with low traffic, but the visitors and users should still have a pleasant experience and speed is a big part of that.

Sometimes managed shared hosting is the only option for small sites, which shouldn't be a problem for Drupal (and it is not a problem for WordPress).

January 4, 2011 - 09:54
Thomas Svenson (not verified):

"While we made a lot of progress in making distributions feasible from a technical point of view, we have yet to figure out the business model around Drupal distributions. Unless we make it commercially interesting or at least commercially viable for organizations to build and maintain high quality distributions, distributions might not be as popular as we'd like."

Looking at the distributions that are available, they are quite big ones. Maybe another approach is to start with more simple ones that are especially targeted at small sites.

One such common need is a blog. A distribution that focuses on providing the needs of bloggers, using the 80/20 rule, I am quite sure of would turn out to be popular. Another distribution could target the needs of a small business that needs a website where they can promote themselves as well as socialise with their customers.

Themes will be needed to fully support these distros as well.

Another thing that will be needed for distributions to take if is better awareness of them on d.o. People coming there wanting to download and test drupal ends up on the Drupal core project page, download it, leaves and go on to install it.

There is a tab called "Installation profiles" at the top, but that's not very telling for someone new to Drupal. It is also the only hint on that page about some alternative.

D.o needs a page that better lists available distributions, what they do and preferable with a link to a demo site and sites already using it.

At the top of the Drupal core project page there needs to be a box with a short clear explanation about the difference between Drupal core and distribution. Using Views slideshow to flip through screenshots of, and linking to, available distros as well as a link to the above mentioned distribution overview page.

We within the community knows about distributions, but we keep them a secret. New users needs to be clearly shown they exists and the benefits of them.

/thomas

January 4, 2011 - 12:39
Rahimanuddin Shaik (not verified):

I am into Drupal recently. Hope there is lot in store for me!

January 4, 2011 - 12:46
Alex Papanicolaou (not verified):

Wow Drupal's turning 10?!

January 4, 2011 - 16:09
Jason Flatt (not verified):

Like Olaf and Larry, I am also glad to hear that Drupal's roots are not forgotten. I am also glad to hear that "general usability improvements for content creators and site builders and performance improvements for single machine installations" will be focused on again. Those are all areas that first attracted me to Drupal more than seven years ago.

For some time now, I have been wondering if Drupal is heading in a direction that will not include me. I understand that in order for Drupal to survive long term, it has to be able to address the needs of the corporate world and an enterprise installation. However, it has felt like that has been the focus of much of the activity to the exclusion of all other. Everyone wants that lottery of a big business paying mucho dinero for a big website, but there are other needs out there.

I prefer to focus on the smaller businesses and individuals. They need websites, too. They need to be able to have the same ability to get noticed (SEO) as everyone else (whether they use it or not is another story). The owner(s) needs to be able to operate it themselves, w/o having to constantly call in someone for minor operations. Finally, the websites need to be affordable for a smaller business or individual.

The ability to be able to provide those things is the reason I originally started using Drupal. With the focus lately of many of the people and many of the changes on drupal.org & in Drupal itself, I have wondered over the past year if my days with Drupal were numbered. I hope not.

January 4, 2011 - 17:43
Graham Oliver (not verified):

I am a recent convert to Drupal and am very encouraged by the enthusiasm for improving the system. As a designer of a few small/medium sites, previously (and still in some cases) using Dreamweaver, I would like to make a plea for two areas that I see as needs.

Firstly, I think that Panels are of great value in creating interesting page layouts and breaking away from what has become almost a standard CMS look. I look forward to using Panels when ready in Drupal 7 - and perhaps they should be in core in Drupal 8?

Secondly, I have often with Dreamweaver made use of dynamic pages using PHP/MySQL datatables and have found this easy to do. But, so far, have found use of Views etc much more complex. Perhaps it has to be complex because of the undoubted power of the Drupal system?

To summarise, I hope that some consideration will be given to ease of use by designers of small websites who want a bit extra but are put off by too much complexity.

Thank you all for providing Drupal! Keep up the good work - I will try and help once I have climbed a bit higher on the steep learning curve.

January 4, 2011 - 18:05
Larry Garfield (not verified):

You'd probably be interested in the Butler project, which is not quite Panels In Core but is conceptually similar: http://groups.drupal.org/butcler

It's currently paused for a bit while we get D7 out and I have 12 other things I try to work through, but rest assured this will play a major role in Drupal 8.

January 5, 2011 - 05:51
Dave T (not verified):

Dries - As usual, great recap, post, and comments!

However, there is one important item I think you failed to mention and that's the role marketing will play in 2011. In order to "compete" with Wordpress or better yet proprietary vendors, the Drupal community must do a better job at trumpeting Drupal's benefits. Mobile app development, usability improvements, advancing distributions, performance upgrades, etc. is all for not if we cannot effectively position and market Drupal.

This is where evangelizing needs to take hold – more case studies, white papers, analyst coverage, webinars, certification programs, open-houses, seminars, media reports, public training, etc. must take place. This all leads to better credibility and general recognition. Information technology decision makers need validation and precedence that their idea to implement Drupal is not some trendy selection, but one cemented with well-grounded justification.

Believe me, I'm not trying to stir the religious debate around what department (marketing or IT) is more critical, but I would assert that Drupal's recent growth had a lot to do with Acquia having capital to generate solid collateral and hire a dedicated sales team (there was never a 10+ sales/marketing force at a Drupal shop before). This needs to continue and be a concerted effort. It certainly is not Acquia's sole responsibility.

There are strides being made (i.e. Business Summits, CXO event in Europe, more non-techie sessions at Camps/Con, etc.), but its just the tip of the iceberg to what the closed-source vendors are doing (and spending).

The metaphorical reference would be the Presidential election - no matter what political party you belong to, I would argue that Obama lost because he did a lousy job of communicating and getting his message out - let's not let that happen in Drupal.

Cheers,

Dave
Mediacurrent

January 5, 2011 - 00:02
Bruce Letterle (not verified):

Happy New Year Dries!

Many good points in this post. I have to say that Drupal Gardens may be the best thing you've done to reclaim/maintain the low end of the market. I am very pleased with the packaging and have already built a number of small sites with it. The reception from my clients has been fantastic. I'm looking forward to a partner program and continued module releases like the event calendar.

Our firm has built many sites with Joomla and WordPress over the years and we are convinced that Drupal 7 jumps past them both in ease of use and as always with Drupal, features.

Thanks.

January 5, 2011 - 21:28
Chris Gillis (not verified):

I think 2011 is the year to bring Drupal up to speed with Accessibility.

One of the major demographics to be targeting is government. During increasingly poor economic conditions, government still has money to spend, and is keeping Drupal Developers in business. To build a site for government organisations here in Australia, you need two major components.
1) Advanced Metadata. (The metatags module seems promising on this front)
2) AA-Level Accessibility.

This is something that MUST be handled in Drupal Core. We should focus first on achieving accessibility for website visitors (Drupal 8?) and then achieving accessibility for website editors (Drupal 9?).

Solid accessibility in core is a MAJOR selling point for any CMS, and will bring developers flocking from proprietary systems.

I also love the idea of better mobile support and HTML5/. :)

Here's to the second Drupal Decade!

January 8, 2011 - 01:35
Anonymous (not verified):

I second and third this motion. 2010 was the year of usability. 2011 must be the year of ACCESSIBILITY ... in CORE. Usability and accessibility are two sides of the same coin. Usability and accessibility are a big part of the user experience, and the biggest users and promoters of Drupal are governments of the world.
The Dutch, Canadian, Australian, American and other governments have mandated conformance with WCAG level AA for all websites.
HTML5 is one of the technologies that will help enable accessibility. Another vote for HTML5 and mobility too.

Looking forward to Drupal 8!

January 11, 2011 - 17:27
mwangi (not verified):

My personal experience is that people who have a bad experience with Drupal have them because of the advanced features that Drupal is able to do. let me explain.
Compared to existing CMSs, Drupal offers far much more than most of them and this puts strains on server requirements, bandwidth, skills etc. I am convinced that it is not usually a drupal issue but rather a server issue brought about by the same requirements that necessitate the use of Drupal. Like if a developer needs to configure his server to do some custom stuff based on his site's needs and has problems with it - he blames the whole experience on Drupal - while the problem is most probably his server configuration or implementation of the drupal solution

more training materials are needed

February 25, 2011 - 09:35

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